Streets Locator


New York Harbor to 50th Street, 1776, from the British survey at the dawn of the Revolution

Manhattan’s Perpendicular Grid Plan Streets and Avenues

The Manhattan Island we know today was pre-destined to become as it is. Beginning with Dutch-colonial landfill projects moving interior land to the shoreline, and then, in as ambitious a manner, with British policies and similar goals to increase commerce. These humongous fill-ins added to-and eliminated the irregular-East River and Hudson (North) River waterfronts, expanding them north continuously.

By 1889, Manhattan’s south-and-north and east-to-west Street and Avenue design was complete, its mass transportation open, and a 1,441,000 population lived and worked as well as moved for a nickel between New York Harbor and Spuyten Duyvil, as the northernmost creek.

Three crucial elements elevated the island capable to be a world-class metropolis. Only a small fraction were natural:
1) Ice-free water borders-the harbor, river, creek, and estuary-to reach for.
2) A rock-solid foundation to build upon-initially, with abundant timber forests.
3) New York City commissioners’ Plan of 1811 formally, the Commissioners’ Map and Survey of Manhattan Island.

Arguably the third factor was the important component added on. The design became a blueprint to pursue as perpendicular arties was. Actualizing its implementation unrelentingly, was fodder to fuel a 77-year unbridled growth span (although with savage bust cycles, too).

This 1811 urban plan changed much for better, and some for the worse too. There was much the commissioners could not possibly foresee. For example-continuous surging, upward-mobile, immigrant waves; innovations, for instance, electricity requiring underground wiring; a steam-engine, two-paddle clipper; the Erie Barge Canal, creating more and more demand for Hudson River docks and warehouses; and a mass transportation system, above and below ground.

Moreover, the 1811 plan proved to be flexible. Enough so, to allow the unique American Dream of Fifth Avenue, the Avenue, which accommodated the pronouncement-“I’ve arrived”. From its start at Washington Square-to eradicate a public-health-related, mosquito-ridden Minetta Creek, by a city council edict-this central roadway would connect Downtown Manhattan with the Midtown old Middle Road, near to the Harlem Common in the East 90s.

Fifth Avenue as a concept immediately captured the imagination of the city’s elite. Its aristocratic appeal was an absolute-set in stone. Furthermore social awareness and a complementary, progressive, urbane Central Park concept reinforced the progressive movement’s cornerstone: build “livable,” mid-island residential neighborhoods.

This, as well as generous, civic-minded land grants or city council purchases corrected a blatant commissioners’ Plan of 1811 failure: lacking expansive common spaces throughout the island. Given a 13.4 mile length and 2.3 miles widest span, it is easy with hindsight to appreciate the advantage more open space, and additional north-and-south Avenues as well as decreased crosstown streets, with supplemental wider east-to-west streets, would be.

Yet in 1811, extensive north-and-south traffic was not the case, the demand then was river to river. This practical, but rigid perpendicular “grid plan” accommodated the initial surveying and dividing a rugged terrain into uniform, rectangular, development blocks-north of the initial settlement.

Additionally, the design-begrudgingly, at times-resulted in the expansion of Broadway. By increasing the major Native people’s trail to join the amalgamated northern Broad Way, and then incorporating the mid-island, Bloomingdale Road as well as seven miles north, connecting Upper Manhattan’s Kingsbridge Road, which completed a continuous, land route from Lower Manhattan to the Albany Post Road.

Remarkable remains that the city advanced any plan at all in 1811. Or, that the commissioners selected to read the future well enough to conceive a rigid grid; one to accommodate sidewalks and curbs; motorcars and mass transit; the elevator, making a skyscraper possible; as modestly averring to mandated a city limit, as West 155th Street, that ‘would contain 400,000 souls.’

For a 60,000-citizen city to have projected for itself even a 400,000 future-and so far north-are extraordinary enough instances for a conscious vision. Also, the case is made for the plan to end where precipitous cliffs seemed impenetrable to level to the necessary grade, given the engineering know-how at the time.

Who knew? The right approximation was 1,500,000 citizens residing in Manhattan merely 80 years hence, as the 1890 census attests.

The Lay of the Land

Due to established street patterns and a concentrated, population density in 1811, Lower Manhattan as well as northeast and northwest Downtown (Canal to 14th Street)spreading east from the Bowery, and then again west to Sixth Avenue, went undisturbed by the upcoming grid design.

These vast land tracts were owned by Dutch scions, and the neighborhoods they encompass, are: the Rutgers and Rhinelander clans, Greater Chinatown; James and Oliver De Lancey, Peter and Nicholas Stuyvesant, the Lower East Side; Nicholas and Samuel Bayard, Little Italy, LoLita, SoHo and NoHo; Lady Sarah (nee de Lancey) and Sir Peter Warren, the West Village, including Abington Square, at one-time, Lady Warren’s gardens.

Although the south-to-north Avenues have been widen-several times, for the most part-these initial, easterly, family-owned street designs and westerly, haphazard laid out farm lanes, overall, were transformed into roadways, retained their name designations as well as their integrity-from origination to wending ways to unexpected ending points.

East-to-west Streets

The island’s regularly spaced Streets are set at a right angle to equally rigid, uniform north-to-south Avenues. An even number address is on the south side. The nearest corresponding odd number runs parallel and opposite on the north side.

Between Eighth and 200th Street, each east-to-west roadway runs continuously from river to river. At the Hudson and East River-which becomes the Harlem River, above East 104th Street-the streets dead-end at both north-and-south riverside highways.

As well, above East 142nd Street, where the island narrows sufficiently, there is no differentiation between the east and west side, on West streets exist. What’s more, the list of exceptions includes the public open spaces. In Lower Manhattan, New York City Hall Park; Downtown’s Thompkins Square, Union Square, Stuyvesant Square, and Grammercy Park; Upper East and West side’s Central Park; as well as Uptown’s Morningside and St. Nicholas Park.

On the north side, uptown, the street addresses are consecutive odd numbers, and even numbers are on the north side or downtown side. Above Eighth Street the address numbering starts at Fifth Avenue, with No. One or No. Two East or West, and increase two digits every 25 feet (a standard city lot width), until reaching the last structure. The greatest street address is 950 East 14th, and 660 West 114th Streets-coinciding with Manhattan’s widest points.


Lower Manhattan and Downtown, 1817, including Houston to 23rd Street

Additionally, above East 142nd Street, where the island narrows sufficiently, with no differentiation between the east and west sides, there are West streets only. What’s more, the list of exceptions includes the mid-island, public open spaces. For instance, Lower Manhattan’s
New York City Hall Park, Downtown’s Thompkin or Union Square Park, Midtown’s Central Park, or Uptown’s Morningside or St. Nicholas Park.
All central island street addresses comprise odd numbers on the north side, and even numbers to the south or downtown side. Above Eighth Street the numbering starts at Fifth Avenue, with No. One and No. Two East or West, progressively increasing by two digits every 25 feet until reaching the last structures: 950 (at East 14th) and 660 (on West 114th) Streets-Manhattan’s widest points.
Furthermore, the crosstown roadways consistent width (60 feet) are broken by a wider (100 feet), two-way traffic, thoroughfare, although somewhat randomly placed. These wider accesses, from south to north, are:

  • Lower Manhattan-Chambers and Worth Streets, both moving westerly, and Canal Street, which is two-way traffic flow;
  • Downtown-Delancey and Grand (both easterly from the Bowery), Houston (westerly traffic flow west of Sixth Avenue), 14th and 23rd Streets;
  • Midtown-34th, 42nd, 57th and 59th Street, (Central Park South);
  • Upper East and West Sides-72nd, 79th, 86th, and 96th Streets;
  • Uptown-East and West 106th, 110th (Central Park North), 116th, 125th, 135th Streets as well as West 145th and 155th Streets;
  • Upper Manhattan-West 165th and 181st Streets. Between West 194th and 220th Streets, both the Streets and Avenues are named. In addition, the terrain is too hilly for a straight, wide, east-to-west Street. In Inwood Hill and Fort George Hill cliffs the grid is set at an oblique angle to the established southern grid plan.

The South-to-north Avenue Address Locators

To begin, there are far more consistent aspects to Manhattan’s 140 to 150 feet wide thoroughfares, and the few quirks are consequential. Every exception affects the consistent street numbering, referred to as Lot and Block numbers. In every instance an even number address is on that Avenue’ west side. An odd number runs parallel and approximately opposite the east side.

Regarding the address and nearby crosstown streets, they are: Avenues A-D, Lexington and Madison Avenues are closer to 80 feet apart rather than 120 feet wide. The block lengths are unequal as well. The distances vary, in feet, as:

  • 425, from Third to Lexington to Park (Fourth), as well as to Madison Avenue;
  • 615 to 650, from Avenue D to Third Avenue;
  • 920 feet, between Fifth and Sixth Avenues;
  • 800, from Sixth to Twelfth Avenue.

These north-to-south arteries were not conceived to move the bulk of traffic as they do today, the traffic flow emphasis was river to river. Therefore, they have been widened considerably, with the changing demands.

Even when a name-change occurs, which they often do, the traffic direction is continuous, and rarely vary. Being an island, an Avenue may deviate when approaching one of four tunnels or the fourteen bridge’s ingress and egress ramps, or at the turnaround plazas. Initially, each south-and-north roadway was two-way; though several remain.

However, they are either at the extreme east or west, such as Sutton Place South to Sutton Place, which becomes York Avenue above East 60th Street; East End Avenue running between East 79th and 90th Streets; Broadway, above West 60th Street, West End Avenue between West 44th and 59th Streets, as Eleventh Avenue, and to West 108th Street; Riverside Drive, starting on West 72nd to West 125th Streets, and irregularly throughout Harlem and Upper Manhattan.

The single mid-island exception is Fourth Avenue, which accommodates both directions, as Park Avenue South, between East 14th and 33rd Street, and then as Park Avenue to East 97th Street.

The north bound traffic flow is on First, Third, Madison, Sixth, Eighth and Tenth Avenues. On the other hand, south-bound vehicles use Second, Lexington, Fifth, Seventh and Ninth Avenues as well as the above-mentioned two-way Avenues.

Granted, names such as First or Twelfth Avenue and every number between, are hardly more imaginative than the East or West Street number designations. What is a benefit is every address begins at its northernmost point, with No. One and opposite No. Two. As well as consistently increasing by two digits every 25 feet, as the roadway proceeds north.

Each even number is on the east side, the coinciding odd number always run along the west block front. However, since the Avenues begin at different points, working from a south-to-north Avenue to another and then the next, the numerical address do not follow uniformly. Therefore, pinpointing an exact address to its nearest cross streets is not exact science.

For 200-odd years, the calculation was determined using a two-step formula, which requires employing all available fingers or toes, too. What’s more, with the island’s undulating shoreline-by broadening unevenly or narrowing sharply, even though having been somewhat mitigated by landfill projects. Naturally, unexpected exceptions crop up at the extremes, often compensating for truncated portions, and each involves a third dimension, along with additional unused digitals.

The very peskiest Avenue exceptions occur wherever Streets have given names, without given consecutive number designations. Therefore, in addition to Lower Manhattan, each neighborhood’s exact boundary, between West Canal and Houston Street, and then to West 14th Street, is irregular.

There are three additional East Side Avenues in Lower Manhattan, and they are:

  • Lafayette Street, which begins at Centre Street and moves through to East Eighth Street. Then, between East 8th and 14th Streets it is Fourth Avenue, and becomes Park Avenue South to East 32nd Street, and then Park Avenue to 135th Street.
  • Running parallel as well as beginning at Chambers Street is Center Street. This wide road narrows for two blocks as Cleveland Place, and then merges into Lafayette Street, at Spring Street. Park.
  • Park Row starts along New York City Hall Park, becomes the Bowery at Chatham Square, and continues after East 8th Street as Third Avenue.

There are additional East Side Avenues in Downtown, and from east to west, they are:

  • Allen Street starts at Canal Street and becomes First Avenue at Houston Street.
  • Chrystie Street starts at becomes Second Avenue at Houston Street.
  • University Place begins at East 4th and ends at 14th Street, and then reappears at East 23rd Street, as Madison Avenue, continuing to East 138th Street.

The New York City commissioners’ Plan of 1811 accepted that below Houston Street would be impractical to convert to a true grid; they wisely set their targets beyond. Without complex leases to contend with, or established housing already on preliminary laid out lanes, the perpendicular design was rigorous implemented across the vast northern, hilly and swampy wastelands. The design ignored farm tracts and country estates borders. Unwaveringly, the terrain was leveled and graded. The Street and Avenue pattern, divided as 191 to 201 feet-wide blocks, were further divided into 25 by 100 feet standard city lots.

Then, There Is Broadway

Other than the truncated one-mile-long Harlem Lane, spanning West 110th to 124th Streets, the hard-and-fast gird arrangement provided not one northwest-to-southwest thoroughfare. Thus, ignoring Broadway’s foremost value, cutting Manhattan’s checkerboard quality by crossing nine south-and-north Avenues. Proof of its magnetic quality is that throughout Midtown, lacking a similar beneficial channel, the East Side development lagged behind the West Side, consistently.

Broadway runs the island’s full length, from New York Harbor to the northernmost point, Spuyten Duvil Creek, at West 220th Street. Manhattan’s narrow southernmost point throughout Lower Manhattan, the East and West Side designations are unnecessary. At Canal and to Eighth Street, the artery divides the Downtown’s East Side from West Side. Broadway is then on the East Side until 23rd Street. At the Fourth Avenue crossing, the roadway disappears to accommodate Union Square’s unique traffic divergence. When re-emerging north of East 17th Street, the roadbed assumes a decidedly southeast to northwest trajectory. After East 23rd Street, and for the subsequent five miles north, Broadway remains the principal West Side thoroughfare.

At West 59th Street and continuing north to West 168th Street, Broadway widens from four to six lanes, with a planted mall to West 168th Street. At West 78th Street, and north to West 168th Street, Broadway remains on a due north trajectory east of Eleventh and Twelfth Avenues, which are West End Avenue and Riverside Drive. Reaching Upper Manhattan Broadway continues due north, and from West 191st to 201st Street, the roadway is the one north-and-soth Avenue to traverse the Inwood and Fort George Hill sheer cliffs, at the base.

Around the third wider, crosstown Streets, where Broadway also intersects a West Side Avenue, the major plaza formed, include:

  • Fifth Avenue, 23rd to 25th Streets, is Madison Square Park.
  • Sixth Avenue, West 32nd to 35th Streets, are Greeley and Herald Squares.
  • Seventh Avenue, West 42nd to 47th Streets, is Times Square.
  • Eighth Avenue, West 58th to 60th Streets and abutting Central Park, is Columbus Circle.
  • Ninth (Columbus) Avenue, West 63rd to 66th Streets, becomes Lincoln Square.
  • Tenth (Amsterdam) Avenue, West 70th to 74th Streets are Sherman Square and Verdi Park;
  • Eleventh (West End) Avenue, West 106th to 108th Streets, is Straus Park.

Broadway also intersects the farthest westerly Uptown diagonal Avenues, as:

  • Hamilton Place, West 136th to 138th Streets, is Montifore Park.
  • St. Nicholas Avenue, West 167th to 170th Streets, is Mitchel Square Park.

As Broadway straightens to move due north, in Uptown, St. Nicholas Avenue begins on a sharp northwest trajectory at West 110th Street and Sixth Avenue, and continues through West 135th Street and Eighth Avenue. Thereafter, St. Nicholas Avenues adjusts to a north-northwest curve to West 169th Street. In Upper Manhattan, the roadway moves due north until West 193rd Street.


New York Harbor, inclusive of Midtown to 51st Street, 1850, as a Central Park was debated.

Beginning at its northernmost major thoroughfare, Canal Street, ending at New York Harbor, the island’s southernmost tip, and extending from the East to Hudson River, this was Manhattan’s earliest settlement.

The five residential enclaves are spread throughout between the Hudson to East Rivers. From meager beginnings, this outpost evolved as a worldwide port and became the Municipal

Seat-simultaneously though briefly the Nation’s Capital-the central business district, which continues as a vibrant financial hub, is most always defined by its main artery, Broadway.

Manhattan settlement’s residential enclaves, each now revived, are scattered among skyscrapers, and they include:

  1. Greater Chinatown includes the entire northeast quarter.
  2. Civic Center, with New York City Hall Park, comprises the northernmost central corridor.
  3. East River Waterfront spreads along the southeast sector.
  4. WiFi, the Financial District, now consists of the entire central vicinity to New York Harbor.
  5. Battery Park City is a late 1960s far west, landfill extension into the Hudson River.
  6. TriBeCa, the amalgam of five Historic Districts, sprawls northwesterly to Canal Street, irregularly.

Lower Manhattan is encased by highways, and can be accessed by the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges as well as the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel and Holland Tunnel, to New Jersey. Three wider east-to-west thoroughfares are in the northern sector, as Chambers, Worth and Canal Streets.

Each named Street’s address begins at the extreme east or Northeast, and the designation increases consecutively until reaching the western terminus building. The north side consists of even numbers exclusively; the north side is the odd numbers.

The designations, whether Street, Place, Lane, Slip, or Alley, in alphabetical order, are:

Albany Street
Ann Street
Barclay Street
Battery Place
Baxter Street
Bayard Street
Beach Street
Beaver Street
Benson Street
Crdnl Hayes Place
Carlisle Street
Catherine Slip
Catherine Street
Cedar Street
Chambers Street
Cherry Street
Chrystie Street
Cliff Street
Clinton Street
Coenties Alley
Coenties Slip
Collister Street
Cornelia Street
Cortlandt Alley
Cortlandt Street
Beekman Street
Delancey Street
Albany Street
Ann Street
Barclay Street
Battery Place
Baxter Street
Bayard Street
Beach Street
Beaver Street
Benson Street
Crdnl Hayes Place
Carlisle Street
Catherine Slip
Catherine Street
Cedar Street
Chambers Street
Cherry Street
Chrystie Street
Cliff Street
Clinton Street
Coenties Alley
Coenties Slip
Collister Street
Cornelia Street
Cortlandt Alley
Cortlandt Street
Beekman Street
Delancey Street
Leonard Street
Madison Street
Maiden Lane
Marketfield Street
Market Slip
Market Street
Mechanics Alley
Mill Alley
Monroe Street
Morris Street
Mott Street
Mulberry Street
Murray Street
Narrow Street
Nassau Street
New Street
N. Moore Street
New York Plaza
Old Slip
Oliver Street
Park Place
Peck Slip
Pearl Street
Pell Street
Peter Minuit Plaza
Pine Street
Reade Street
Rector Street
Ryder Alley
S. Williams Street
Spruce Street
St. John’s Lane
Staple Street
State Street
Stone Street
Thames Street
Theater Alley
Thomas Street
Trimbel Place
Varick Street
Vesey Street
Vestry Street
Walker Street
Wall Street
Warren Street
Watts Street
West Street
White Street
Whitehall Street
William Street
Worth Street
York Street

The Streets and Avenues originating and terminating within Battery Park City, from south to north, are: West Street, Little West Street, South End Avenue, W. Thames Street, Rector Place, North End Avenue, River Terrace, 1st and 2nd, and 3rd Places.

The East-to-west Street Address Locators

From Civic Center to City Hall Park, the east-to-west Streets then through Battery Park City, from south to north, are:

Easternmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Westernmost Address and Cross Street
Chambers Street in City Hall Park through TriBeCa to Battery Park City
1@Park Row 130@West Broadway 260@West Street 400@River Terrace
Worth Street Greater Chinatown through Civic Center to Battery Park City
200@Bowery 100@Broadway 1@Hudson Street
State Street East River Waterfront to WiFi
5@Whiltehall 7@Pearl Street as well as Battery Park to Bowling Green Park
Battery Place as WiFi
1@ Broadway 17@West Street

The South-to-north Street Address Locators

The north-and-south thoroughfares, from east to west, and starting at New York Harbor, and moving to Canal Street, the northern boundary, are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Broadway as WiFi as New York City Hall Park as Greater Chinatown
1@State Street 210@Vesey 420@Canal Street
South Street crossing the East River Waterfront to Greater Chinatown
1@ Battery Park 120@Peck Slip 239@Market Slip
Front Street across the East River Waterfront
1@Old Slip 150@Maiden Lane 400@ Dover Street
Water Street across the East River Waterfront
1@Broad Street 135@Pine Street 276@Dover Street
Pearl Street across the East River Waterfront
1@State Street 200@John Street 400@Madison Street
St. James Place within Greater Chinatown
1@Madison Street 35@James Street 70@Worth Street
Bowery within Greater Chinatown
1@Division Street 28@Bayard Street 54@Canal Street
Broad Street as WiFi
1@Wall Street 70@Beaver Street 140@ South Street
Park Row along City Hall Park to Chinatown
1@Ann Street 130@St. Andrews Place 260@Worth Street
Centre Street along City Hall Park to Chinatown
1@Chambers Street 80@Leonard Street 160@ Canal Street
Lafayette Street along City Hall Park to Chinatown
1@Worth Street 55@Franklin Street 110@ Canal Street
Broadway moves from WiFi to City Hall Park near to TriBeCa East and to Greater Chinatown
1@Battery Place 208@Fulton Street 416@Canal Street
Trinity Place through WiFi
1@Edgar Street 50@Rector Street 104@Cedar Street
Church Street through City Hall Park and the border between TriBeCa West and East
1@Cortlandt Street 160@Chambers Street 325@Canal Street
Sixth Avenue through TriBeCa
1@White Street 32@West Broadway 64@Canal Street
West Broadway through TriBeCa
1@Vesey Street 142@Thomas Street 285@Canal Street
Varick Street through TriBeCa
1@Franklin Street 31@Beach Street 63@Canal Street
Hudson Street through WiFi and TriBeCa
1@Reade Street 100@Franklin Street 200@Canal Street
Greenwich Street throughout WiFi in TriBeCa
1@Battery Place 142@Liberty Street 240@Park Place 471@Canal Street
Washington Street throughout WiFi in TriBeCa
1@Battery Place 130@Albany Street 366@Hubert Street 477@Canal Street
West Street Street in WiFi in Battery Park City in TriBeCa
1@Battery Place 140@Barclay Street 288@Canal Street

From Canal Street, the northernmost border is 23rd Street. This entire part of town extends from the East to Hudson River. From Love Lane, roughly 23rd Street, all the Native Manhattanite trails and paths began. They developed as the routes north.

Fifth Avenue ends at Seventh Street in favor of Washington Square, so to Canal Street, Broadway separates the East Side from the West Side. Named Streets are concentrated south of (East) Houston and (West) 12th Streets. Like Lower Manhattan address numbering starts in the east and continues west, with consecutive, even address on each Street’s south side, and with odd numbers running opposite.

Throughout Downtown East similar, planned housing communities form a continuous ribbon along the East River block to First Avenue. The easterly accesses, as an Avenue ‘A’ through Avenue ‘D’, were included between Houston to East 14th Street, where the island’s easterly shoreline widens. However, these Avenues disappear completely before East 23rd Street. The easterly Downtown Manhattan neighborhood boundaries, from south to north and east to west, are:

  1. The Lower East Side, traditionally, encased Canal to East Houston Street, and the East River to the Bowery. The revival brought distinct enclaves as Greater Chinatown, as along Canal Street and East Broadway, running between the East River to the Bowery; the Lower East Side, as Delancey to Houston Street, spanning Clinton Street to the Bowery; Little Italy and NoLita, as the southwestern quarter, spreading from the Bowery to Broadway, and Canal to East Houston Street.
  2. East Village is East Houston to 14th Street, extending from the East River to Broadway. Within the core enclaves are 9) Alphabet City, the farthest south and east Avenues as a revitalized neighborhood; 10) NoHo, at the East Village’s southwest, between Second Avenue and Broadway; Central East Village surrounding Cooper Union and along St. Mark’s and Astor Places; as well as the 11) Gold Coast, which includes East Eighth to 13th Street, Fourth and Fifth Avenues.
  3. Stuyvesant Square encompasses East 15th to 20th Streets, between Third to Second Avenues.
  4. Gramercy Park includes East 20th to 21st Streets, within a narrow confine of Park Avenue South to Third Avenue section. The Lexington Avenue and Irving Place, and the adjacent blocks, between East 17th to 23rd Streets, are designated as the ‘Gramercy Area’.
  5. Union Square ‘Area’ covers East 12th to 17th Streets, and spreads from Third to Fifth Avenues.
  6. Flatiron District runs between East 18th to 23rd Streets, and spans the Park Avenue South to Broadway and into the Fifth-to-Sixth-Avenues-mid-block.

Canal to East Broadway to East Houston Street Address Locators

Not one double-wide, east-to-west Street was inserted between Canal and Houston Streets. At the east, the narrow road beds, often no wider than a lane, make up the uber-revived Lower East Side as a neighborhood. It is now encased between Delancey, Rivington, Stanton, and Houston Streets, and spans Bowery to Clinton Street, which is approximately at Avenue B.

To the center, between the Bowery and Broadway, still in Downtown East, where Broadway separates east from west, is a second neighborhood, Little Italy and NoLita.

Along East Broadway, within the farthest southeasterly quarter is Greater Chinatown. The existing east-to-west roadways, are:

Within Greater Chinatown
Easternmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Westernmost Address and Cross Street
Canal Street
116@Essex 125@Bowery 203@Mulberry 277@Broadway
Grand Street
350@Essex 240@Bowery 190@Mulberry 125@Broadway
Broome Street
280@Essex 333@Bowery 384@Mulberry 444@Broadway
On the Lower East Side
Delancey Street as Delancey as Kenmare – Kenmare Street
120@Essex 1@Bowery 1@Bowery 114@Centre Street
Rivington Street
120@Essex 42@Forsyth 77@Allen 7@Bowery
Stanton Street
116@Essex 1@Boweryy
East Houston Street
240@Essex 95@Bowery 47@Mulberry 1@Broadway

Lower East Side south-to-north roadways, from east to west, are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Clinton Street
116@Delancey 64@Rivington 30@Stanton 4@East Houston Street
Suffolk and Norfolk Streets
116@Delancey 105@Rivington 166@Stanton 188@East Houston Street
Essex Street
99@Delancey 131@Rivington 153@Stanton 190@Houston Street
Ludlow Street
10@Canal 100@Delancey 188@Houston Street
Orchard Street
10@Canal 100@Delancey 188@Houston Street
Allen Street
10@Canal 100@Delancey 170@Houston Street
Eldridge Street
30@Canal 160@Delancey 250@Houston Street
Forsyth Street
100@Canal 102@Delancey 200@Houston Street
Chrystie Street
40@Canal 140@Delancey 230@Houston Street
Bowery
60@Canal 160@Delancey 300@Houston Street

Within Little Italy and NoLita, which is west of Bowery, the north-and-south Streets continue, as follows:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Elizabeth Street
30@Canal 150@Kenmare 270@Houston Street
Mott Street
90@Canal 190@Kenmare 300@Houston Street
Mulberry Street
100@Canal 190@Kenmare 300@Houston Street
Centre Street as Cleveland Place
167@Canal 255@Kenmare 15@Kenmare 35@Spring Street
Lafayette Street
120@Canal 210@Kenmare 295@Houston Street
Crosby Street
5@Howard 40@Broome 146@Houston Street
Broadway
420@Canal 510@Broome 600@Houston Street

East Houston to 14th Street Address Locator

From this intersection, known as North Street, the New York City commissioners’ Plan of 1811 was implemented…without question…throughout the East and Harlem River’s length.

Therefore, the Avenue and Street Address Locators continue uniformly through each neighborhood: Downtown East, Midtown East, Upper East Side, and Uptown, where each Avenue terminates at the Harlem River.

The East-to-west Street Address Locators

The exceptions, between East First and Eighth Streets, in central East Village and NoHo, include:

  • On East First through Fourth Streets, the address numbering starts at the Bowery.
  • On East Fifth through Seventh Streets-as Bleecker, Bond, and Great Jones Streets respectively-address numbering begins at Broadway;
  • On East Eighth Street, No. One begins at Fifth Avenue, moving east, and increases by 2 digits at each standard 25-foot city lot.

Beginning at Fifth Avenue, with No. one, the highest numbers are nearest the Hudson River, and from east to west, and they are:

  • Numbers 1-30 East, Fifth Avenue to University Place (as Greenwich Village) or Union Square West, along East 14th to 17th Streets (as Union Square Area)
  • East First through Fourth Streets, as Nos. 1-80, run from the Bowery to First Avenue (as NoHo)
  • Numbers 51-99 East, University Place or Union Square West to Fourth Avenue or Park Avenue South (East 14th to 23rd Streets as Greenwich Village)
  • Numbers 100-199 East, Fourth Avenue to the Bowery (Broadway to Fourth Avenue included to East 14th Street as Central East Village) (Note St. Marks Place moves as East Eighth Street between Third Avenue and Avenue ‘A’
  • Nos. 200-299 East, the Bowery (to East Seventh Street), and then Third to Second Avenues (Central East Village)
  • Nos. 300-399 East, Second to First Avenue (Central East Village)
  • Nos. 400-499 East, First to Avenue ‘A'(within Alphabet City)
  • Nos. 500-599 East, Avenue ‘A’ to Avenue ‘B'(within Alphabet City)
  • Nos. 600-699 East Avenue ‘B’ to Avenue ‘C’, between East Houston and Fourteenth Streets (within Alphabet City)
  • Nos. 700-799 East Avenue ‘C’ to Avenue ‘D’ (within Alphabet City)

The South-to-north Avenue Address Locators

Alphabet City is the East Village easterly enclave. It comprises East First to 13th Streets, surrounds Tompkins Square Park, encompassing Avenue ‘A’ to ‘B’ and East Seventh to Tenth Streets, and then to the East River. These north-to-south Avenues, from east to west, are:

Easternmost Address and Cross Street Westernmost Address and Cross Street
Avenue D
12@East Houston 200@East14th Street
Avenue C
12@East Houston 300@East17th Street
Avenue B
18@East Houston 255@East14th Street
Avenue A
24@East Houston 219@East14th Street

Central East Village is East Fifth to 13th Streets, and surrounds the Cooper Union campus at the Bowery, Lafayette Street, and Astor Place.

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
First Avenue (as Stuyvesant Square Area)
15@East Houston 228@East14th 400@East23rd Street
Second Avenue (as Stuyvesant Square Area)
5@East Houston 223@East14th 300@East23rd Street
Bowery (as Third Avenue) (as Grammercy Park Area)
299@East Houston 1@East Seventh 300@East23rd Street
Irving Place (as Union Square Area) Lexington Avenue (as Grammercy Park)
1@East14th 85@East 19th 1@East22nd 17@East23rd Street
Fourth Avenue (Central East Village) Park Avenue South (Union Square to Flatiron District)
2@St Marks Place 150@East 14th 200@East 14th 300@East 23rd Street
Note: the name change
Broadway (as NoHo) (as East Village (as Union Square) (as Flat Iron District)
600@East Houston 770@East Eighth 860@East 14th 940@East 23rd Street
University Place (as Greenwich Village) (*Union Square West) (as Union Square Area)
1@East 121@East14th 1@East14th 41@East 17th Street
Note: the name change
Fifth Avenue (as Greenwich Village) (as Union Square Area) (as Flat Iron District)
1@East Eighth 69@East 14th 200@East23rd Street

Canal to West Houston Street Address Locators

Within the Canal to West 23rd Street and Fifth Avenue to the Hudson River borders, the westerly neighborhood boundaries, from south to north and east to west, are:

  1. SoHo, bounded by Lafayette to Sixth Avenue, runs between Canal and East Houston Streets.
  2. North of TriBeCa also East Hudson Square or West SoHo as well as So-Greenwich Village was the 1600s Bayard estate, Richmond Hill. Also, the site of Bayard Hill, a 1775 War of Independence battles.
  3. Greenwich Village stands between West Houston and 14th Streets, and Broadway to Sixth Avenue.
  4. Village, the Greenwich Hamlet, comprises Houston Street to Sixth Avenue at West Eighth Street, Seventh Avenue South at West 11th Street, and Hudson Street at West 13th Street.
  5. West Village, for 150 years, Pig’s Alley, remains as West Houston to 13th Streets and between Hudson Street, which becomes Ninth Avenue at the northern expanse-the Meatpacking District stretch-to the Hudson River.
  6. Chelsea takes in West 14th to 23rd Streets, and runs between the Hudson River and Sixth Avenue. Clement Clarke Moore owned the Eighth Avenue to the River, between West 18th to 25th Streets. And Ladies’ Mile, an elegant, easterly neighborhood, between Fifth and Seventh Avenues, running between West 12th and 25th Streets.

Broadway to Sixth Avenue, as SoHo-Cast-Iron Historic District includes random, short and non-contiguous, cobblestone-paved, north-and-south Streets, and they are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Mercer Street
1@Canal 90@Spring 170@West Houston Street
Green Street
1@Canal 82@Broome 150@Houston Street
Wooster Street
1@Canal 88@Spring 150@Houston Street
West Broadway
300@Canal 400@Spring 480@Houston Street
Thompson Street
2@Canal 80@Spring 160@Houston Street
Sullivan Street
55@Broome 160@Houston Street
Macdougal Street
36@Broome 64@Houston Street
Sixth Avenue
100@Grand 115@Broome 230@Houston Street

The east-to-west streets within SoHo-Cast-Iron Historic District, from south to north, are:

Easternmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Westernmost Address and Cross Street
Howard Street (running four blocks)
2@Centre Street 50@Mercer Street
Grand Street
100@Broadway 50@West Broadway 23@Sixth Avenue
Note: sequence reversal
Broome Street
444@Broadway 500@West Broadway 525@Sixth Avenue
Spring Street
100@Broadway 150@West Broadway 200@Sixth Avenue
Prince Street
100@Broadway 50@West Broadway 200@Sixth Avenue
West Houston Street
1@Broadway 175@Sixth Avenue

The Charlton-King-Vandam Historic District-as a residential section-runs west of Sixth Avenue to Varick Street. In addition, the mostly commercial area-with various place-name changes– are the continuous thoroughfares extending west to the Hudson River. They include:

Easternmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Westernmost Address and Cross Street
Broome Street
535@Sixth Avenue 580@Hudson Street
Spring Street
200@Sixth Avenue 300@Hudson 400@West Street
Vandam Street
1@Sixth Avenue 50@Varick Street 100@Greenwich Street
Charlton Street
1@Sixth Avenue 55@Varick Street 110@Greenwich Street
King Street
1@Sixth Avenue 50@Varick Street
West Houston Street
175@Sixth Avenue 220@Varick Street 350@West Street

The thoroughfares, West of SoHo-Cast-Iron Historic District from south to north, are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Varick Street
10@Broome 55@Vandam 00@Houston Street
Hudson Street
250@Broome 350@King 380@Houston Street
Greenwich Street
480@Canal 522@King 580@Houston Street
Washington Street
480@Canal 540@King 570@Houston Street
West Street
300@Spring 320@Charlton 340@Houston Street

West Houston to 14th Street Address Number Locators

To begin, here there is no norm to the Address Locators. This hodge-podge, without any particular rhyme or reason-at least, never for long-can be broken down into elements.

  1. The north-to-south Avenues are consistent, as Fifth, (Macdougal, also as Washington Square West), Sixth, Seventh Avenue South, Eight Avenue (as Hudson Street), and Greenwich, Washington to West Street (the westerly highway), as continuations.
  2. Between West Eight and 13th Streets, the Address Numbers are-
    1. Fifth Avenue as 1 West
    2. Sixth Avenue as 100 West
    3. Seventh Avenue as 200 West
    4. Eighth Avenue as 300 West
    5. Ninth Avenue as 400 West
    6. Tenth Avenue as 500 West
    7. Eleventh Avenue as 600 West
  3. The east-to-west lanes wind in and around and twist as well as hook between each other. Worse: they dead-end helter-skelter, in a manner defying sense. This maze simplifies when separated according to the constant north-and-south thoroughfares.
  4. Additionally, several wider roadways move diagonally on a north-northwest or southwest-to- southeast trajectory, beginning west of Sixth Avenue to Hudson Street (or Eighth Avenue).
  5. The Neighborhoods, from east to west, are: Greenwich Village (Broadway to Sixth Avenue), the Village (Sixth Avenue to Hudson Street), and the West Village (Hudson to West Street).

Within the Village, the diagonal southeast-to-northwest Street Address Locators, radiating from the Bleecker Street and Sixth Avenue intersection, from south to north, are:

Southeast Northwest
Bedford Street juts northwest, (and crosses Downing, Carmine, Leroy, Morton, Commerce, Barrow, Grove, and terminates at Christopher Street, east of Hudson Street).
1@Sixth Avenue 48@Seventh Avenue South 120@Christopher Street
West 4th Street moves north-northwest, (and crosses Cornelia, Jones, Barrow, Grove, Christopher, West 10th, Charles, Perry, West 11th, Bank, West 12th, Jane, Horatio and Gansevoort to West 13th Street, at Eighth Avenue).
160@Sixth Avenue 204@Seventh Avenue South 330@Jane Street
Waverly Place, which is West Seventh Street, moves northwest, (and crosses Gay, Christopher, West 10th, Charles, Perry to West 11th Street, east of Eighth Avenue).
126@Sixth Avenue 200@Seventh Avenue South 250@Bank Street
Greenwich Avenue runs northwest at West Eighth Street, (and crosses Christopher, West 10th, and terminates Charles and Perry, crosses West 11th, terminates Bank, crosses West 12th, crosses Jane and Horatio, and terminates at West 13th Streets and Eighth Avenue).
1@Sixth Avenue 75@Seventh Avenue South 125@Hudson Street

The Greenwich Village has five irregular southerly Streets and six Streets which begin to conform to the grid plan of 1811. The east-to-west Streets between West Houston and Seventh Street, which is Waverly Place, and then Washington Square North, runs as:

Easternmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Westernmost Address and Cross Street
Bleecker Street
80@Broadway 145@LaGuardia Place 200@Sixth Avenue
West Third
1@Broadway 70@LaGuardia Place 140@Sixth Avenue
West Fourth Street (in Sheridan Square)
6@Broadway 66@LaGuardia Place 150@Sixth Avenue
Washington Place (in Sheridan Square)
1@Broadway 30@Washington Square East 65@Washington Square West 90@Grove Street
Waverly Place (in Sheridan Square)
1@Broadway 30@University Place 14@Washington Square North 130@Sixth Avenue

In Greenwich Village, the north-and-south Streets, from east to west, are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Mercer Street
180@Houston 310@West Eighth Street
Wooster Street (as Washington Square East — as University Place)
158@Houston 79@West Third 1@West Sixth 126@West 14th Street
Note: the name change
La Guardia Place (to West Fourth Street)
490@Houston 570@Washington Square South
Thompson Street (to West Fourth Street)
160@Houston 250@Washington Square South
Sullivan Street (to West Fourth Street)
160@Houston 265@Washington Square South
Sullivan Street (to West Fourth Street)
70@Houston 180@West Eighth Street

In the Village, the north-and-south Streets, from east to west, are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Sixth Avenue
256@Houston 400@West Eighth 530@West 14th Street
Varick Street
200@Houston 1@Carmine Street 200@West 11th Street
Note: the name change
Hudson Street
388@Houston 600@West Tenth Street 680@West 14th Street
Note: the name change
Eighth Avenue
22@West 12th Street 80@West 14th Street

In the West Village, the north-and-south Streets, from east to west, are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Ninth Avenue (running two blocks)
7@Gansevoort Street 40@West 14th Street
Greenwich Street
585@Houston 850@Gansevoort Street
Washington Street
575@Houston 880@West 14th Street
Weehawken Street (running one block)
13@Christopher 1@West 10th Street
Note: sequence reversal
Weehawken Street (running one block)
350@Houston 20@West 14th Street
Note: the name change

In the Village, the Southwest-to-northeast Streets (including name changes and non-contiguous lanes) crossing between Sixth Avenue and West Street, from east to west and south to north, are:

Easterly Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Westerly Address and Cross Street
Downing Street
10@Sixth Avenue 64@Varick Street
Carmine Street (as Clarkson Street) (as West Village)
1@Sixth Avenue 1@Varick 28@Hudson 72@West Street
Leroy Street (as West Village)
7@Bleecker Street 50@Seventh Avenue South 89@Hudson Street 160@West Street
Cornelia Street (running one block)
5@West Fourth Street 31@Bleecker Street
Morton Street (as West Village))
5@Bleecker Street 32@Bleecker Street 70@Hudson 100@West Street
Jones Street
5@West Fourth Street 32@Bleecker Street
Gay Street (running one block)
16@Christopher Street 4@Waverly Place
Commerce Street (running two blocks with a hook north)
5@West Fourth Street 31@Bleecker Street
Barrow Street (through Sheridan Square) (as West Village)
11@West Fourth 35@Seventh Avenue South @Hudson Street 144@West Street
Grove Street (ends in Sheridan Square)
4@Hudson Street 27@Seventh Avenue South 170@Waverly Place
Easternmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Westernmost Address and Cross Street
Note: the roadbeds directions adjust
Christopher Street (through Sheridan Square) (as West Village)
1@Sixth Avenue 65@Seventh Avenue South 90@Bleecker Street 180@West Street
West 10th Street (as West Village)
101@Sixth Avenue 160@Seventh Avenue South 250@Hudson Street 397@West Street
Charles Street (as West Village)
3@Greenwich Avenue 44@Seventh Avenue South 120@Hudson Street 165@West Street
Charles Lane (running one block) (as West Village only)
3@Washington Street 16@West Street
Perry Street (as West Village))
6@Greenwich Avenue 25@Seventh Avenue South 100@Hudson Street 173@West Street
West 11th Street (as West Village)
100@Sixth Avenue 200@Seventh Avenue South 300@Hudson Street 370@West Street
Bank Street (as West Village)
2@Greenwich Avenue 100@Hudson Street 166@West Street
Bethune Street (running two blocks) (as West Village only)
13@Hudson Street 68@West Street
West 12th Street (as West Village)
100@Sixth Avenue 200@Seventh Avenue South 300@Hudson Street 400@West Street
Jane Street (as West Village)
1@Greenwich Avenue 60@Hudson Street 113@West Street
Horatio Street (Jackson Square) (as West Village)
2@Greenwich Avenue 58@Hudson Street 114@West Street
Gansevoort Street (running as West Village only)
30@Hudson Street 100@West Street
Little West 12th Street t (running as West Village only)
1@Ninth Avenue 56@West Street
West 13th Street (as West Village)
100@Sixth Avenue 200@Seventh Avenue South 300@Hudson Street 445@West Street

West 14th to 23rd Street

As Chelsea, from Fifth Avenue west to the Hudson River, West 14th to 23rd Street, the address numbering is

  • The Nos. 1-99 West run from Fifth to Sixth Avenues.
  • The Nos. 100-199 West are from Sixth to Seventh Avenue.
  • The Nos. 200-299 West stay between Seventh Avenue and Eighth Avenues.
  • The Nos. 300-399 West remains between Eighth and Ninth Avenues.
  • The Nos. 400-499 West start at Ninth and end at Tenth Avenue.
  • The Nos. 500-565 West exists from Tenth to Eleventh Avenue.

Throughout Chelsea the north-and-south Streets, from east to west, are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Fifth Avenue
80@West 14th 200@West 23rd Street
Sixth Avenue
526@West 14th 720@West 23rd Street
Seventh Avenue
1@ West 11th 220@West 23rd Street
Eighth Avenue
80@West 14th 250@West 23rd Street
Ninth Avenue
10@West 13th 210@West 23rd Street
Tenth Avenue
10@Little West 12th 210@West 23rd Street
Eleventh Avenue
151@West 22nd 179@West 23rd Street


Beginning as the southernmost point at 23rd and inclusive of 60th Street. Beginning to end this mid-island parts of town run as Midtown East from Fifth Avenue to First Avenue along the East River. The westernmost portion, Midtown West, Fifth Avenue to Twelfth Avenue, specifically, surrounding Fifth Avenue west to Seventh and east to Third Avenues is Manhattan’s retail-shopping and tourist magnet as well as an elite office skyscraper and premier commercial hub (-bub).

This renowned slice of Manhattan is a two-square-mile square. The four sides, actually throughout are Fifth Avenue to the East River and Fifth Avenue to the Hudson River, on the west. Moreover, each ten-block marker is a differentiation, as: West or East Twenties, Thirties, Forties, and Fifties; as it comprises sectors: southern central, easterly and western; dead center easterly and western; and northern central, easterly and western.

Beginning at West as well as East 23rd Streets, with the northernmost point as East and West 59th Streets, for better than 175 years, there was one broad and continuous slum blocks, a swath spreading between First to Third Avenues as well as Ninth to Eleventh Avenues. Nowadays, the residential pockets form enclaves, which are nestled unexpectedly, and cropping up amid commercial office-building skyscrapers-especially near to Central Park, and along Park and Fifth or Seventh Avenues, (once was touted as Avenue of the Future).

The prevalent dwelling types range, in sporadic pockets, from-an apartment hotel co-operative to steel-and-glass condominium tower, which are peppered intermittently by an array of pre- and post-war (comparatively, low-rise) apartment houses, nestled among the sky-high building corridors-such as Fifth-to-Madison or Park-to-Lexington Avenues.

For the most part, the Midtown neighborhoods fall within ten-block stretches-the West Twenties, Thirties, Forties, and Fifties-and running from west to east, are:

  1. North Chelsea is between West 23rd and 34th Streets, and expands from Eighth Avenue’s west to the Hudson River.
  2. NoMad has a westernmost portion, stretching between West 23rd and 29th Streets, and spans west of Fifth Avenue to Broadway.
  3. Hell’s Kitchen runs from West 35th to 48th Streets, stretching west at Eighth Avenue to the Hudson River.
  4. Clinton, West 50th to 60th Streets, extends from Eighth Avenue to the Hudson River.
  5. West Fifties, as such encompasses Fifth (The) Avenue to Eighth Avenue, and includes abutting Fifth-to-Lexington-Avenue blocks, between East 60th to 55th Streets, as well.

Specifically, Sixth to Fifth to Madison to Park Avenues is a worldwide retail-shopping and specialty-store mecca and international tourist magnet as well as Manhattan’s elite office skyscraper hub and the anchor for one premier, Manhattan condominium tower corridor. Indelibly bisected at Third Avenue, the easterly residential neighborhoods, from north to south and east to west, are:

  1. Sutton Place is along the East River in the northeastern-most East Fifties
  2. Beekman Place is along the East River in the southeastern-most East Fifties.
  3. Turtle Bay, east of Third Avenue to the East River, comprises the entire East Forties.
  4. Murray Hill, from Fifth to Third Avenues, is in the East Thirties.
  5. Kips Bay, from Third to First Avenues, spreads from high East Twenties to low East Thirties.
  6. Madison Square North, from Fifth to Park Avenue South, is in the southwestern East Twenties.

The East-to-west Street Address Locators

Throughout Midtown a Street’s north side is an even number. Starting at Fifth Avenue as No. Two, and then continuing consecutively to the highest address number, which is at the farthest west or east. Likewise, each street’s north side, an odd number, begins with No. One, and extends to the Hudson or East River.

From Fifth Avenue west to the Hudson River, West 14th to 59th Street, Central Park South, the address numbering is:

  • Nos. 1-99 West, Fifth to Sixth Avenues to West 59th Street;
  • Nos. 100-199 West, Sixth to Seventh Avenue;
  • Nos. 200-299 West, Seventh to Eighth Avenue;
  • Nos. 300-399 West, Eighth to Ninth Avenue;
  • Nos. 400-499 West, Ninth to Tenth Avenue;
  • Nos. 500-599 West, Tenth to Eleventh Avenue;
  • Nos. 600-699 West, Eleventh to Twelfth Avenue.

The Street Address Locators continue consecutively, running in units from Avenue to Avenue, as:

  • Nos. 1 to 30 East, from Fifth to Madison Avenue;
  • Nos. 51 to 99 East, from Madison to Park Avenue or Park Avenue South;
  • Nos. 100 to 125 East, from Park to Lexington Avenue;
  • Nos. 125 to 199 East, from Lexington to Third Avenue;
  • Nos. 200 to 299 East, from Third to Second Avenue;
  • Nos. 300 to 399 East, from Second to First Avenue;
  • Nos. 400 to 499 East, from First Avenue to the East River, as First Avenue to Beekman Place or Sutton Place in the East 50s.

The Easterly South-to-north Avenue Address Locators

Midtown East contains six north-and-south Avenues throughout, as-Fifth through First Avenues. In addition, Madison and Lexington Avenues were inserted above East 23rd Street, in the Fifth-to-Park-Avenue and Park-to-Third-Avenue mid-blocks, respectively. Between East 129th and 139th Streets both Avenues terminate, along with the East River’s contour.

In every instance, an even number address is on that Avenue’ west side. An odd number runs parallel and approximately opposite the east side. The Avenue locator numbers, from south to north, are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Fifth Avenue as NoMad Monumental Midtown West Fifties
200@East 23rd 350@34th 500@42nd 630@50th 785@59th Street
Madison Avenue as NoMad Murray Hill Monumental Midtown The Fifties
1@East 23rd 188@E 34th 300@E 42nd 450@E 50th 630@E 59th Street
Park Avenue South as NoMad Murray Hill
300@E 23rd St 480@E 31st Street
Park Avenue Murray Hill Monumental Midtown East Fifties
1@E 32nd St 125@E 42nd 300@E 50th 500@E 59th Street
Lexington Avenue Murray Hill Monumental Midtown East Fifties
1@E 22nd 235@E 34th 390@E 42nd 550@E 50th 750@E 59th Street
Third Avenue Murray Hill Turtle Bay East Fifties
300@E 23rd 500@E 34th 650@E 42nd 880@E 50th 999@E 59th Street
Second Avenue Kips Bay Murray Hill Turtle Bay East Fifties
380@E 23rd 610@E 34th 800@E 42nd 950@E 50th 1100@E 59th Street
First Avenue Kips Bay Murray Hill Turtle Bay Beekman Place Sutton Place
400@E 23rd 600@E 34th 730@E 42nd 900@E 50th 1080@E 59th Street

The Westerly South-to-north Avenue Address Locators

Midtown West throughout has Fifth through Twelfth Avenues. There are mid-island irregularities, such as tunnels burrowed through the Murray Hill schist or laying atop the Turtle Bay and Beekman Place cliffs, or those West side hills, climbing from Reed Valley’s floor, at West 55th Street and plateauing at West 60th Street.

In every instance, an even number address is on that Avenue’ west side. An odd number runs parallel and approximately opposite the east side. The Avenue locator numbers, from south to north, are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Broadway North Chelsea Hell’s Kitchen Clinton West Fifties
1100@West 23rd 1320@W 34th 1400@W 42nd 1630@W 50th 1800@Columbus Avenue
Sixth Avenue North Chelsea Monumental Midtown West Fifties
700@West 23rd 900@W 34th 1100@W 42nd 1250@W 50th 1470@W 59th Street
Seventh Avenue North Chelsea Monumental Midtown West Fifties
220@West 23rd 450@W 34th 550@W 42nd 750@W 50th 940@Central Park South
Eighth Avenue North Chelsea Monumental Midtown Clinton
240@West 23rd 480@W 34th 630@W 42nd 830@W 50th 990@ Central Park South
Ninth Avenue North Chelsea Hell’s Kitchen Clinton
220@West 23rd 420@W 34th 570@W 42nd 740@W 50th 920@W 59th Street
Tenth Avenue North Chelsea Hell’s Kitchen Clinton
220@West 23rd 420@W 34th 570@W 42nd 750@W 50th 920@W 59th Street
Eleventh Avenue North Chelsea Hell’s Kitchen Clinton
180@West 23rd 370@W 34th 555@W 42nd 700@W 50th 900@W 59th Street
Twelfth Avenue North Chelsea Hell’s Kitchen Clinton
150@West 23rd 270@W 34th 510@W 42nd 660@W 50th 840@W 59th Street

The southern boundary is at Central Park’s northeastern-most corner, Grand Army Plaza on East 60th Street, and northernmost point is East 96th Street (with an exception farther along upper Fifth Avenue to East 98th Street), the end is at and extends from Fifth Avenue to the East River throughout.

Indelibly bisected at Third Avenue, the residential neighborhoods, from north to south and west to east, are:

  1. The Social Sixties comprises East 70th to 60th Street, east of Central Park and west of Third Avenue, which takes in Treadwell Farm, at the East-62nd-to-61st-Street mid-block, running between Second and Third Avenues.
  2. Lenox Hill stretches from East 85th to 71st Street, between Fifth and Third Avenues, which contains the Metropolitan Museum of Art Historic District, an enclave running along Fifth to Madison Avenues, spreading between East 84th and 78th Streets, exclusively.
  3. Metropolitan Museum Historic District is East 84th to 78th Streets, as well as those adjacent blocks, in the Fifth-to-Madison Avenues, exclusively.
  4. Carnegie Hill encompasses the northwest quadrant, from East 98th to 86th Street, spanning Fifth to Lexington Avenues.
  5. Yorkville, the eastern sector (originally) extending from the mid-East 90s to 77th Streets-nowadays some say, East 72nd, others East 60th Street-and dominates Second Avenue to the East River.

The East-to-west Street Address Locators

Throughout Upper East Side the Street’s north side is an even number. Starting at Fifth Avenue as No. Two, and then continuing consecutively to the highest address number at the farthest east. Likewise, each street’s north side, an odd number, begins with No. One, extending to the East River. Continuing consecutively, the Street address locators run in units from Avenue to Avenue, as:

  • Nos. 1 to 40 East, from Fifth to Madison Avenue
  • Nos. 50 to 99 East, from Madison to Park Avenue
  • Nos. 100 to 130 East, from Park to Lexington Avenue
  • Nos. 135 to 199 East, from Lexington to Third Avenue
  • Nos. 200 to 299 East, from Third to Second Avenue
  • Nos. 300 to 399 East, from Second to First Avenue
  • Nos. 400 to 499 East, from First to York Avenue
  • Nos. 500 to 599 East, from York to East End Avenue or the East River

The South-to-north Avenue Address Locators

The Upper East Side numbering consistently carries through from where Midtown East (which continued from Downtown East.) Therefore, the numbers graduate from south to north. The easternmost Upper East Side Avenues, continuations of Avenues ‘B’ and ‘A’, re-emerge as the island expands. The Avenues, from east to west, they are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Cherokee Place Yorkville
1@East 77th 99@E 78th Street
East End Avenue Yorkville
1@East 79th 140@E 86th 200@E 90th Street
York Avenue Yorkville
1111@East 60th 1335@E 72nd 1495@E 79th 1630@E 86th 1775@E 93rd Street
First Avenue – Treadwell Farms Yorkville
1066@East 60th 1325@E 72nd 1510@E 79th 1650@E 86th 1860@E 96th Street
Second Avenue – Treadwell Farms Yorkville
1100@East 60th 1400@E 72nd 1520@E 79th 1660@E 86th 1860@E 96th Street
Third Avenue – Social Sixties Lenox Hill Carnegie Hill
995@East 60th 1250@E 72nd 1390@E 79th 1530@E 86th 1700@E 96th Street
Lexington Avenue – Social Sixties Lenox Hill Carnegie Hill
770@East 60th 970@E 72nd 150@E 79th 1280@E 86th 1490@E 96th Street
Park Avenue – Social Sixties Lenox Hill Carnegie Hill
524@East 60th 750@E 72nd 900@E 79th 1040@E 86th 1240@E 96th Street
Madison Avenue Social Sixties Lenox Hill Metropolitan Museum Historic District Carnegie Hill
655@East 60th 870@E 72nd 1035@E 79th 1180@E 86th 1380@E 96th Street
Fifth Avenue Social Sixties Lenox Hill Metropolitan Museum Historic District Carnegie Hill
789@East 60th 900@E 72nd 980@E 79th 1050@E 86th 1150@E 96th Street

Prior to Central Park opening in 1858, the sector beyond the Broadway’s intercession at Central Park South and Eighth Avenue (the Bloomingdale Road at West 59th Street and the Great Circle), and then spreading from Columbus Circle to the Hudson River through West 125th Street, was one vicinity. It was named after Bloomingdale Hill, at West 94th Street and Ninth (Columbus) Avenue.

In the northwest corner the Bloomingdale village ended at a bluff above the Harlem Plain. Besides the entirely hilly and rocky terrain, there were intermittent streams, creeks, and marshes. The dominant feature, though, was abundant, colossal sold rock protrusions. This was where the bastion in Manhattan for Patroon country seats. Many lasting through to the 1870s.

The separate, north-and-south corridors, running through the Upper West Side are defined, as:

  1. Lincoln Square encompasses the West Sixties from Central Park to the Hudson River.
  2. Central Park West spans West 60th to 96th Streets along the park and to Columbus Avenue.
  3. Riverside-West End spans West 72nd and then continues north to 107th Street, and from Broadway to Riverside Park.
  4. Schuyler Corridor spans West 72nd to 96th Streets, and encases west of Columbus Avenue to East of Broadway.
  5. Manhattan Valley stretches from West 94th to 110th Streets, and spreading between Central Park West and Broadway.
  6. Morningside Heights, historically-speaking is within the Bloomingdale Village, spanning the West Nineties to West 125th Street, and running from Broadway to Riverside Drive.

The simple Upper West Side Street address numbering, between West 59th and 109th Streets, accommodating Central Park, is:

  • 1-99 West, Central Park West to Columbus Avenue;
  • 100-199 West,Columbus to Amsterdam Avenue;
  • 200-299 West, Amsterdam to West End Avenue;
  • 300-399 West, West End Avenue to Riverside Drive.

The south-and-north Avenues, between West 60th and 107th Streets, are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Broadway Lincoln Square Riverside-West End Morningside Heights
1840@West 60th 2060@W 72nd 2230@W 79th 2350@W 86th 2560@W 96th 2830@W 110St
Central Park West Lincoln Square Central Park West
1@West 60th 115@W 72nd 185@W 79th 256@W 86th 360@W 96th 500@W 110St
Manhattan Avenue Manhattan Valley Morningside Heights
1@West 100th 220@W 110St
Columbus Avenue Lincoln Square Central Park West Schuyler Corridor Manhattan Valley
20@West 60th 260@W 72nd 400@W 79th 550@W 86th 725@W 96th 1020@W 110St
Amsterdam Avenue Schuyler Corridor Manhattan Valley
1@West 60th 263@W 72nd 400@W 79th 530@W 86th 740@W 96th 1020@W 110St
West End Avenue Riverside-West End
1@West 60th 260@W 72nd 400@W 79th 540@W 86th 735@W 96th 787@W 110St
Riverside Boulevard South Riverside-West End
40@West 60th 240@W 72St
Riverside Drive Riverside-West End
1@W 72nd 70@W 79th 140@W 86th 400@W 96th 380@W 110St

Harlem is inclusive of everything between the Hudson and East Rivers, and sprawls north of the Upper East and West Sides, from East 96th or West 110th Street, and reaches to West 155th Street, which is the southern boundary of Upper Manhattan.
Above Central Park, from west to east, they are:

  1. Morningside Heights is the southwest sector, comprising Cathedral Parkway (West 110th) to 122nd Street, spreading east from Amsterdam Avenue to Morningside Drive (and Park, sitting atop a bluff) and Avenue, to Fredrick Douglass Boulevard to St. Nicholas Avenue.
  2. South Harlem, Harlem’s “Magic Triangle,” encompasses Central Park North to West 124th Street, spanning Manhattan to Madison Avenues, and increasing west along Morningside Avenue to the east, from Sixth Avenue or Malcomb X Boulevard to Marcus Garvey Memorial Park.
  3. Manhattanville or Central Harlem, runs from Doctor Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (West 125th Street), continues to West 154th Street, and bridges Amsterdam to Fifth Avenue.
  4. Hamilton Heights surrounds the City College of New York campus, from West 141st to 147th Streets, and includes Edgecombe Avenue, Hamilton Terrace and Convent Avenue.
  5. Sugar Hill, and Extensions, above West 149th to 155th Street, encompassing west of Amsterdam and east of Edgecombe Avenues, was once Harlem’s premier neighborhood.
  6. East Harlem, referred to as El Barrio, encompasses Fifth Avenue to the East River, spreading from East 96th to 143rd Streets, and was all but decimated (between 1930 and 1936) to carve out plaza ingresses and egresses, for the Robert F. Kennedy (formerly, Triborough) Bridge. Only endless housing projects remain.

Above Central Park North, the Uptown address numbering begins at Fifth Avenue. This creates an East Harlem from East 97th to 142nd Street. Thereafter, only West Address Locators exist. The eight Avenues crossings follow, as:

The easterly Uptown Address Locators between East 97th and 143rd Streets, are:

  • Nos. 1-50 East are between Fifth and Madison Avenues, up to East 139 Street.
  • Nos. 51-99 East are between Madison and Park Avenues, up to East 134 Street.
  • Nos. 100-149 East are between Park and Lexington Avenues, up to East 131 Streets.
  • Nos. 150-199 East are between Lexington and Third Avenues, up to East 128th Street.
  • Nos. 200-299 East are between Third to Second Avenues, up to East 126th Street.
  • Nos. 300-399 East are between Second to First Avenues, up to East 124th Street.
  • Nos. 400-499 East are between First to York Avenues, up to East 90th Street.
  • Nos. 500-599 East are between York (Avenue ‘A’, or Pleasant Avenue, or East End Avenue ‘B’.)

Note: East 110th Street is Tito Puente Way; West 106th Street is Duke Ellington Boulevard

The westerly Uptown Address Locators, between West 110th and 155th Streets, are:

  • Nos. 1 to 99 West is from Fifth to Sixth Avenues (alternately, Malcolm X Boulevard).
  • Nos. 100 to 199 West is Sixth to Seventh Avenue (alternately, Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard).
  • Nos. 200 to 299 West is Seventh to Eighth Avenue (alternately, Frederick Douglass Boulevard).
  • Nos. 300 to 399 West, running between Eighth and Ninth Avenues, from west to east, are: Manhattan to St. Nicholas to Edgecombe or Bradhurst Avenues, with
  • Nos. 400 to 499 West are between St. Nicholas to Amsterdam Avenue.
  • Nos. 500 to 599 West are between Amsterdam to Broadway.
  • Nos. 600 to 699 West are between Broadway to Riverside Drive.

Above Central and Riverside Park the south-and-north-running Avenues, from west to east, are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Riverside Drive Morningside Heights Manhattanville Hamilton Heights Sugar Hill
440@W 116th 560@W125th 583@W135th 676@W145th 765@W 155th Street
Note: Riverside Drive ends at West 155th Street and resumes as Riverside East to 168th Street
Claremont Avenue (non-contiguous) Morningside Heights only
1@W 116th 200@W124th Street
Broadway Morningside Heights Manhattanville Hamilton Heights Sugar Hill
3000@W 116th 3200@W125th 3330@W135th 3540@W145th 3700@W 155th Street
Amsterdam Avenue Morningside Heights Manhattanville Hamilton Heights Sugar Hill
1150@W 110th 1350@W125th 1500@W135th 1700@W145th 1909@W 155th Street
Morningside Avenue Morningside Heights as Convent Avenue Hamilton Heights
1@W 110th 160@W125th 150@W135th 350@W145th 500@W 152nd Street
Morningside Drive Morningside Heights
1@W 110th 160@W122nd Street
Manhattan Avenue Morningside Heights Manhattanville
220@W 110th 370@W 116th 565@W125th Street
Frederick Douglass Boulevard Manhattanville Hamilton Heights
2040@W110th 1900@W116th 2330@W125th 2530@W135th 2720@W145th 2900@W155th
Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Boulevard South Harlem Manhattanville Hamilton Heights
1800@W110th 1900@W116th 2100@W125th 2300@W135th 2500@W145th 2700@W 155th
Malcolm X Boulevard/Lenox Avenue South Harlem Central Harlem
1@W 110th 110@W 116th 290@W125th 450@W135th 700@W145thStreet
Fifth Avenue East Harlem South Harlem Central Harlem
1300@W 110th 1400@W116th 2000@W125th 2200@W135th 2340@W143rd Street
Madison Avenue East Harlem
1650@E 110th 1950@W125th 2200@W138th Street
Park Avenue East Harlem
1500@E 110th 1800@W125th 2000@W135th Street
Lexington Avenue East Harlem
1780@E 110th 1900@W116th 2000@W125th 2200@W131th Street
Third Avenue East Harlem
2000@E 110th 2350@W125th Street
Second Avenue East Harlem
2100@E 110th 2500@W124th Street
First Avenue East Harlem
2100@E 110th 2250@W116th 2400@W125th Street
Pleasant Avenue East Harlem
260@E 114th 300@W116th 380@W120th Street

Additionally, there are six irregular Avenues, and they run on a diagonal, including:

St. Nicholas Avenue Morningside Heights Manhattanville Hamilton Heights Sugar Hill
1150@W 116th 1350@W125th 1500@W135th 1700@W145th 1909@W 155th Street
Note: St. Nicholas Avenue transverses Harlem, beginning at east of Malcolm X Boulevard (Sixth Avenue) and Central Park North (West 110th). Moving on a sharp north-northwest diagonal, at West 124th Street, now west of Frederick Douglass Boulevard (Eighth Avenue), the thoroughfare remains parallel to Ninth Avenue until West 155th Street.
Hamilton Place Hamilton Heights only
1@W 136th 50@W139th 2200@W142th Street
Note: Hamilton Terrace is a short roadway, between West 141st and 144th Street which hooks, climbing the hillside between St. Nicholas and Convent Avenues.
Malcombs Place Central Harlem only
1@W 150th 107 West 155th Street
Note: Malcombs Place runs southwest between Frederick Douglas Boulevard (Eighth) Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard (Seventh), and terminus at the Harlem River.
St. Nicholas Place Sugar Hill only
1@W 149th 1@W 149th
Note: St. Nicholas Place runs between Convent and Edgecombe Avenues-as a 15 row house and flats buildings within the Sugar Hill Historic District Northeast Extension-were built between 1885 and 1909.
Edgecombe Avenue Manhattanville Hamilton Heights Sugar Hill
1@W 135th 107@West 154th Street
Note: At West 137th Street St. Nicholas splits, Edgecombe Avenue continues north-by-northwest to West 155th Street…a parallel Bradhurst Avenue is a short artery, running as:
Bradhurst Avenue
1@W 142nd 265@W148 250@West 154th Street

Greater Washington Heights, formerly Fort Tyron and once-time Fort Washington, encompasses West 155th to 199th Streets, and includes five distinctive neighborhoods, as:

  1. Audubon Park, the southernmost community, to Harlem’s north, encompasses West 155rd to West 164th Streets, and spreads west from Amsterdam Avenue to Riverside Park, includes Trinity Cemetery and the Audubon Terrace Historic District.
  2. Morris-Jumel District takes in West 160th to 162nd Street, from the Amsterdam and St. Nicholas Avenues intersection, spreading one block to cliff-hanging Edgecombe Avenue. The diminutive enclave includes the namesake museum, Sylvan Terrace, which climbs the knoll to the 1700s manor house, and Jumel Terrace with a line of town houses.
  3. The Heights comprises West 159th to 178th Streets-south of George Washington Bridge and its access highways-from Broadway to the Hudson River.
  4. Hudson Heights begins at West 179th and continues to 192nd Streets, both along the Hudson River’s ledge and extending east to include Cabrini Boulevard and Fort Washington Avenue.
  5. Fort George Hill, West 163rd to 193rd Streets, at the Harlem River edge, and sprawling west to Broadway.
  6. Inwood is not Washington Heights proper. It is an independent community starting at West 200th Street, winds round the terrain to 220th Street at the Harlem Creek Canal, spanning the Hudson to Harlem Rivers. In other words: water-bound to the island’s northernmost tip.

The Avenues within the southeast Morris-Jumel District, from east to west, are:

Southernmost Address and Cross Street Midpoint Address and Cross Street Northernmost Address and Cross Street
Edgecombe Avenue Morris-Jumel District The Heights
110@W155th 506@West 171st Street
Note: Running on a ledge above Highbridge Park on the Harlem River
Amsterdam Avenue – Morris-Jumel District – The Heights – Fort George Hill – Inwood
1909@W155th 2600@W188th 3700@201st 4000@W218th Street
Note: Amsterdam Avenue continues, dead-ends, and then resumes in Inwood, as Tenth Avenue
Audubon Avenue Morris-Jumel District The Heights Fort George Hill
1@W165th 320@W181 550@W193rd Street
St. Nicholas Avenue Morris-Jumel District The Heights Fort George Hill Inwood
1900@W 155th Street 1400@W181 1660@W193rd Street
Fort George Hill Inwood
1670@W194th 1700@W 201st Street
Note: Fort George Hill Avenue veers north (and downhill) from the St Nicholas-Amsterdam-Audubon Avenue loop to the Inwood valley floor.
Broadway Audubon Park Hudson Heights Fort George Hill Inwood
3700@W 155th Street 4250@W181st 4600@W196th 5150@220th Street
Note: Broadway Terrace consists of No. 1 through 27, as a short, steep strip, and runs between West 191st and 193rd Streets, off Fairview Terrace and back to Broadway.
Bennett Avenue Hudson Heights Washington Heights
1@W183rd 120@W186th 400@W 195th Street
Fort Washington Avenue Audubon Park Hudson Heights Washington Heights
1@W159th 450@West 181st 699@W192nd Street
Pinehurst Avenue The Heights Hudson Heights
1@W177th 164@W184th Street 215@W187th Street
Haven Avenue The Heights Hudson Heights Washington Heights
60@W168th 105@W175th 200@W177th Street
Cabrini Boulevard The Heights Hudson Heights Washington Heights
1@W177th 450@W191st Street
Colonel Robert Magaw Place Hudson Heights
8@West 181st Street 30@West 183rd Street
Overlook Terrace Hudson Heights Washington Heights
10@W185th 200@W190th Street
Wadsworth Terrace The Heights Fort George Hill
2@W188th 96@W193rd Street
Fairview Terrace Fort George Hill
90@W191th 10@W193rd Street

Inwood is Upper Manhattan’s least known neighborhood. This separate case is nestled within and around rocky terrain, and set on ridges and cliffs-more typical of Adirondack Mountain Park, 175 miles north-the emphatic western boundary is a quintessential example of Manhattan’s natural landscape.

The entire rugged topography has cascading rivulets running toward the Hudson River, tapering off near to Spuyten Duyvil Creek feeding the Harlem River to complete the island’s encasing waterways.

To reach Inwood requires traversing a narrow pass, from West 191st to 194th Streets, and running between the Hudson Heights and Fort George Hill ridges. On the valley floor there is passage only for Broadway to enter or exit south. Beyond the pass, Broadway fans out heading northwest, a second thoroughfare, Nagel Avenue, heads northeast: their V-shape encloses the westerly residential enclave.

Hillside Avenue moves east-northeast across the Inwood valley floor, and then up and along the easterly ridge. Likewise, most Streets and Avenues wind around steep hills, especially when climbing west to Inwood Hill Park, which overlooks the Hudson River. For the most part, the grid is perpendicular and set slightly askew to the right angle grid from West 14th Street.

The Valley Avenues and Streets fall into two sectors, the west is hilly and residential, with broader retail strips, and a smaller industrial, with bridges to the mainland east and northeast. The thoroughfares running northeast-to-southwest the residential Streets, are:

Nagel Avenue
Post Avenue
Sherman Avenue
Vermilyea Avenue
Cooper Street
Payson Avenue
Seaman Avenue

The roadways running northwest-to-southeast, are:

Elswood Street
Sickles Street
Arden Street
Thayer Street
Dyckman Street
Academy Street
West 204th Street
West 207th Street
Isham Street
West 211th Street
West 213th Street
West 214th Street
West 215th Street
West 216th Street
West 217th Street
West 218th Street
West 219th Street
West 220th Street

This easterly industrial sector includes one power plant, endless warehouses, freight tracks, rail yards, parking lots and several bridges to the Bronx. Amsterdam Avenue reemerges at West 201st Street. Now renamed Tenth Avenue, runs parallel to the Harlem River shoreline. The adjacent side-streets are numbered as West 201st to 220th Street.

In addition, a Ninth Avenue re-appears east of the valley, though interrupted sporadically, it follows along the entire easterly Harlem River shoreline. Then at Tenth Avenue’s juncture with Nagel Avenue, alongside the Columbia University sports complex, is the Broadway Bridge.

Between the two ridges, across the expanse to the Spuyten Duyvil Creek and Harlem River, five south-and-north Avenues, and two continuous east-to-west Streets, are:

Broadway
4400@W190th 4900@W207th 5000@W215th 5150@W220th Street
Note: Broadway, the major southwest thoroughfare, arcs to the northeast Broadway Bridge
Ninth Avenue
377@W201th 3884@W208th 4000@W215th 4200@W220th Street
Note: Ninth Avenue runs due north-and-south along the Harlem River, and is broken by railroad yards
Tenth Avenue
3700@Dykman Street 3900@W208th 4000@W215th 4090@W218th Street
Note: Tenth Avenue the easterly thoroughfare picks up from Amsterdam Avenue in Uptown
Nagel Avenue
12@W168th 101@Dyckman Street 270@W205th Street
Note: Nagel Avenue runs below the IRT overhead tracks
Sherman Avenue
3@Broadway 80@Dyckman Street 231@W207th Street 279@W211th Street
Note: Sherman Avenue is lined with six-story apartment houses with ground-level stores
Dyckman Street
100@Nagel Avenue 160@Sherman Avenue 211@Broadway 308@Dyckman Street Viaduct
Note: Dyckman Street moves from the Henry Hudson highway to the Harlem River Driver
West 207th Street
500W@Tenth Avenue 220W@Sherman Street 616@Broadway 666@Seaman Avenue
Note: West 207th Street is a major shopping and transportation hub, and supports two-way traffic