Highlights — All Neighborhoods

Tribeca

Lower Manhattan

At Upper New York Harbor, the island’s southern tip, Lower Manhattan is where it all began, and it still vibrates. By day, this is a worldwide hub of financial commerce, insurance, stock exchanges, and all the related industry; however, by night a few Manhattanites (wisely) refer to the Financial District, Tribeca, New York City Hall Park, Chinatown, or Battery Park City as home. With Tribeca’s coming-of-age a unique smart- shopping-and-dining district was established too. Counter-common-sensical is that (with the exception of Tribeca) some of the most sensible real-estate purchases can still be had here.

Parks

Located at the southern tip of Manhattan with ready access to the harbor and the Hudson River, Battery Park is where the history of New York Citybegan. By 1855, Castle Garden, situated inside the Park, was the world’s first immigrant depot. City Hall Park has played a key role in New York civic life for centuries, from its Colonial beginnings, as a rebel outpost to its current function as the seat of City government.  In 1999, a $34.6 million project fully restored the park, adding a central walkway and gardens and replacing pavement with grass and trees.  The East River Park is a popular recreation swath at the river’s edge, once the worst expanse of notorious Lower East Side tenements. In addition to its views of the East River, it boasts basketball, tennis, and handball courts; playgrounds; a picnic area; softball, football, basketball, and track fields; a river promenade; and a footbridge. Now that’s a change worth taking in.

Historic Districts

Above are  teeming streets, the Civic Center, and New York City Hall park,  and below is little, (no, no evidence) that the African Burial Ground and the Commons ever existed. This is the separate but equal area, near the once toxic and polluted Collect Pond, later the infamous Five Points slums. Due south, less than one mile by crisscrossing narrow lanes is the Fraunces Tavern block and Stone Street Historic Districts, a remarkable and nostalgic peak at colonial Manhattan’s residential area, destroyed by several fires, and vacated by several epidemics, is surrounded by massive limestone, brick, or glass-and-steel office towers.

At the mouth of the East River, just below the Brooklyn Bridge is South Street Seaport and Schermerhorn Row, a further step into Manhattan’s colonial past. Of all Lower Manhattan’s important landmarks, too numerable to enumerate, the commercial warehouses and counting houses, forming the South Street Seaport District, were the providence of first New Amsterdam’s, then British Colonial New York’s, and ultimately the United States’ international bustling harbor. Moreover, there is the seemingly ever-expanding collective Tribeca Historic Districts–north, west, and south extensions–all touching on the World Trade Center reincarnation.

 

Lower Manhattan Neighborhood to Zip Code Index

Chinatown 13, 2

New York City Hall Park 7

South Street Seaport 38

Financial District 38, 7,

BatteryPark City 6

Tribeca 13, 7

Nearby: Lower East Side 02, Nolita 12, Soho 12

 

 

Greenwich Village, Washington Square,

Washington Square Arch

Downtown

Not the downtown of Beatniks or Hippies or Yuppies of recent-lore, the typical new-millennium, downtown-dweller remains the epitome of a casual lifestyle, though now practically main stream. No longer an artist-in-residence-loft enclave alone, here are also the restored Village row house, renovated Nolita tenement, andWestVillageriverside condominium tower.Lower East Sidesidewalk pickle-barrel vendors have been replaced by curbside limo drivers awaiting the area’s new almost-well-heeled denizens ingesting an enviable five-star dinner or imbibing during a hopping-spree waterhole experience. And the push-cart sales spiel has noticeably morphed from a harsh Yiddish-accent cry into a soft French or Italian patois. All the while, downtown just keeps on keeping on…

Parks

Downtown is all about squares. Common open spaces weren’t included in the Commission’s 1811 plan, but were graciously gifted to or acquired by the City in a series of early-nineteenth-century urban planning attempts. The City’s important downtown public spaces areMadison,Union, and Washington Squares, each created by the convergence of thoroughfares with Broadway.  A Peter Stuyvesant scion, and co-founder of the New York Historical Society, gave a small portion of his vast inherited Downtown East landholdings to create Tompkins and Stuyvesant Parks, a second landholding Delancey scion, also the daughter of Peter Warren, the eighteenth-century Greenwich Farm country squire, granted Abingdon Square (the one-time manor house garden) formed by the Bleecker, Bank, and Hudson Streets’ convergence with Ninth Avenue.GramercyParkmeanwhile was merely the real-estate-developer-supreme, Charles Ruggles, brain-storm.

Two recent additions to Downtown Manhattan parks are not yet completed, they remain works in progress. First, the High Line, which sits atop the nineteen-thirty’s freight-train trestles, an urban improvement plan devised to “civilize” the Tenth-Avenue-to Hudson-River district, then known as Pig Alley. And, the recapturing of the Hudson River waterfront for New Yorkers, after the elevated West Side Highway’s demise, This particular park has aspiration of reaching Albany, some100 milesnorth. Perhaps! And if they’re not enough, there is the vibrant basketball court on Sixth Avenue, at West 4th Street, always amplified by vibrating boom boxes still.

Historic Districts

Downtown Manhattan abounds with at least 21 individual, though juxtaposed and distinct, historic  districts, ach contains an array of landmark-designated, architectural-significant, or merely remarkable residential dwelling examples, many are abutting one another. Each historic district is truly a feast for the beholder, and many are but a block long, a few houses wide, or a self-contained enclave.  Check out all the maps by Regarding Real Estate’s links, and if you so choose read a few words or the entire Landmark Commission report.

 

Downtown Neighborhood to Zip Code Index

East

Flatiron 03

Gramercy Park 03

Stuyvesant Square 03

Union Square 03

East Village 03

Alphabet City 09

Noho 03

Nolita 12

Lower East Side 02

Nearby:  Chinatown 13, Greenwich Village 12, Chelsea 11, Kips and Rose Bays 10

 

West

Chelsea 11

Meat-packing District 14

West Village 14

Village 14

Greenwich Village 12

Soho12, 13

Nearby: Tribeca 13, Noho 03, East Village 03, Union Square 03, Flatiron 03, North Chelsea 01

 

 

Midtown

Crossroads of the World

The most intensely and diversely developed piece of real estate on the planet, Midtown Manhattan is New York’s commercial center—if you can’t find what you’re looking for here it probably doesn’t exist. The area is home to the city’s tallest and most famous buildings and contains a multitude of distinct neighborhoods.

Bisected by Ninth Avenue and its scores of ethnic restaurants, once gritty Hell’s Kitchen (also known as Clinton north of 50th Street) has been profoundly gentrified, and is currently in the midst of a continuing building boom. Still offering marginally cheaper housing than neighboring areas, Murray Hill has seen an influx of young professionals and a burgeoning bar and restaurant scene. Dominated by NYU medical school, Kips Bay is the site of two I. M. Pei apartment buildings called Kips Bay Towers. Many quality condominiums can be found on Turtle Bay’s quiet, tree-lined streets, which is also home to the U.N. The Time Warner Center’s twin towers are the hub of the vibrant and convenient Columbus Circle area. The apartments and town houses of Sutton Place and Beekman Place are synonymous with gracious Manhattan living.

 Parks

Bellevue South Park

A hub of community activity that’s situated west, rather than south, of Bellevue Hospital, the oddly named Bellevue South Park, wedged in the middle of a large apartment complex and two medical facilities, is a fanciful green space little known outside the immediate Kips Bay area. The renovated park offers exercise stations, volleyball courts, basketball courts, two playgrounds with sprinklers, and game tables. Along with sculptor Antoni Milkowski’s abstract Skaggerak, whimsical sculptures of flowers, elves, lizards, turtles, frogs, and even animal tracks are placed throughout the park.

Bryant Park

Known as the New York Public Library’s backyard, Bryant Park, named after New York Post editor William Cullen Bryant, naturally offers a selection of complimentary newspapers to read at the park’s numerous tables or on their expansive lawn. There are also a restaurant, a café, free movies in the summer, and free ice-skating in the winter. The Josephine Shaw Lowell Fountain and statues of Gertrude Stein, José Bonifácio de Andrada e Silva, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and William Earl Dodge are among the memorials that dot the grounds.

Central Park is a world-class Midtown, Upper East and West Side, and Uptown neighborhood amenity. For a complete report, read Regarding Real Estates’ unique take, along with its highlights and photography gallery.

De Witt Clinton Park

The neighborhood might be called “Hell’s Kitchen,” but De Witt Clinton Park, named for the New York governor responsible for the construction of the Erie Canal, is a family-friendly place best known for Maria’s Perennial Garden and its well-equipped Erie Canal Playground, featuring a frog spray shower and concrete play mules. Dog runs, basketball courts, baseball fields, and handball courts are also found here. The Flanders Field Memorial, designed by Burt W. Johnson and Harvey W. Corbett, depicts a World War I soldier, or “doughboy.”

Grand Army Plaza

Envisioned as a public space comparable to the Place de la Concorde in Paris, Grand Army Plaza, adjacent to Central Park and the Plaza Hotel, is dominated by Augustus Saint-Gaudens’s gilded bronze equestrian statue of Civil War General William Tecumseh Sherman. Unveiled on Memorial Day, 1903, the statue was restored in 1989, after its gold leaf had peeled away. One block south is sculpture Karl Bitter and architect Thomas Hastings’s tiered granite Pulitzer Fountain, topped by a bronze statue of Pomona, the goddess of abundance, and dedicated in 1916. (Which immediately precipitated the Hearst bequeath due west, at Columbus Circle’s Merchant’s Gate, a monument to remember the sailors on the Maine.)

Hammarskjold Plaza

Named for Swedish diplomat Dag Hammarskjold, the former secretary-general of the United Nations who was killed in a plane crash in 1961 and posthumously awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, Hammarskjold Plaza, located just north of the U.N., is known as a gathering place for public demonstrations. Renovated in 1997, the small park is home to six steel pavilions, each housing a fountain, and a steel lattice dome. The Katharine Hepburn Garden, dedicated to the actress, who lived in the neighborhood, features dogwood trees, witch hazel, and hydrangea.

 Historic Districts

Murray Hill

Among the buildings that comprise this district, known for its classically styled row houses and the cultural impact of its prominent residents—such as Admiral David G. Farragut, who lived on East 36th Street, and Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy, who lived on 35th Street—are two significant structures: The Church of the New Jerusalem, in design part Italianate, part Renaissance Revival, was completed in 1866. In 1916, William A. Delano added a neoclassical façade to a stable on East 38th Street, converting it to an architectural studio.

Sniffen Court

One of the city’s most charming enclaves, this narrow alley on East 36th Street, named after a local builder, John Sniffen, contains 10 intimate, two-story Romanesque Revival houses that were converted from Civil War–era stables. Many of these homes, which are painted various shades of gray, green, and black, feature colorful window boxes and planters. Also located here are a small theater, an architect’s office, and a sculptor’s studio, at the south end of the court, its exterior wall decorated with plaques of Greek horsemen.

Tudor City

Designed under the supervision of architect H. Douglas Ives, Tudor City is an urban-renewal project, completed in 1932 and consisting of 10 Tudor Revival–style residential buildings set off from the street grid on Prospect Hill, near the United Nations. The complex features a series of stained-glass windows, some depicting the history of New York. The district includes the Tudor-style Prospect Hill Apartment Building, constructed in 1925; Tudor City Gardens, a residential building completed in 1956; four 19th-century row houses; two private greens, and two public parks.

Turtle Bay Gardens

This enclave of 20 row houses on East 48th Street built in the 1860s and named for the turtles that once inhabited the area at the East River’s bent-blade shape (in Dutch, a deutal, perhaps Anglicized to turtle) was significantly altered in the 1920s. Architects Edward C. Dean and William L. Bottomley replaced the brownstone façades facing the street with pastel stucco in Flemish and Regency styles; the façades facing the interior gardens were re-done in Mediterranean style. The gardens themselves were transformed into an intimate communal space separated by low walls, filled with greenery, statues, and fountains, and united by a common path down the center.

 

 Midtown Neighborhood to Zip Code Index

West 50s 19

Clinton 19

Hell’s Kitchen 36, 18

North Chelsea 01

Nearby: Chelsea 11, Lincoln Square 23

 

East 50s

Sutton Place 22

Beekman Place 22

East 40s

Turtle Bay17

United Nations Plaza 17

Tudor City 17

East 30s

Murray Hill 16

East 20s

Kips and Rose Bays 10

Nearby:  East 60s, 65, Gramercy Park 03

 

 

Guggenheim Musem of Art

Upper East Side

Though no longer called the Silk Stocking District, the Upper East Side is known for its affluence and expensive real estate. Here elegant town houses and posh apartment buildings line some of the most famous avenues in the world—Fifth, Park, and Madison. In between the U.E.S.’s borders of Central Park and the East River are renowned museums (the Met, the Whitney, the Guggenheim, and many more), exclusive prep schools (Spence, Brearley, St. David and Bernard’s, to name a few), luxurious hotels (the Pierre, the Carlyle, come to mind first), and high-end retailing (Stair & Company, Valentino, merely scratch the surface).  The area is home to many socialites and celebrities—as well as New York’s mayor, whose official residence is Gracie Mansion, in Carl Schurz Park, but he too chooses to live nearer Central Park.

 Parks

Carl Schurz Park

Overlooking the churning waters of Hell Gate on the East River, scenic Carl Schurz Park, named for the statesman and New York Tribune editor, is one of the city’s bijoux. A walk along the promenade offers views from Hell’s Gate and the Roosevelt Island Lighthouse, to the Triborough (now the Robert F. Kennedy) Bridge, Randall’s and Wards Islands. Known as a dog-friendly and family-friendly place—there are two dog runs and a fancifully decorated playground—the park is also home to Charles Andrew Hafner’s bronze Peter Pan sculpture and Gracie Mansion, the mayor’s official residence.

Central Park

Central Park is a world-class Midtown, Upper East and West Side, and Uptown neighborhood amenity. For a complete report, read Regarding Real Estates’ unique take, along with its highlights and photography gallery.

Grand Army Plaza

Envisioned as a public space comparable to the Place de la Concorde in Paris, Grand Army Plaza, adjacent to Central Park and the Plaza Hotel, is dominated by Augustus Saint-Gaudens’s gilded bronze equestrian statue of Civil War General William Tecumseh Sherman. Unveiled on Memorial Day, 1903, the statue was restored in 1989, after its gold leaf had peeled away. One block south is sculpture Karl Bitter and architect Thomas Hastings’s tiered granite Pulitzer Fountain, topped by a bronze statue of Pomona, the goddess of abundance, and dedicated in 1916. (Which immediately precipitated the Hearst bequeath due west, at Columbus Circle’s Merchant’s Gate, a monument to remember the sailors on the Maine.)

John Jay Park

The centerpiece of John Jay Park, named for the New York jurist and located on the East River near 76th Street, is the 145-foot outdoor pool, completed in 1942 by the Work Projects Administration. This Upper East Side community center also contains a bathhouse and Douglas Abdell’s steel sculptures, part of the artist’s Aebyad Series. Adjoining the park are the socially conscious East River Homes, a philanthropic housing project built in 1912 to provide families infected with tuberculosis a place to live normal lives during the long period of rehabilitation.

St. Catherine’s Park

Reconstructed in 1996, St. Catherine’s Park pays tribute to Saint Catherine of Siena, who was known for her devotion to the sick and the poor. The design is based on the Basilica Santa Maria sopra Minerva, in Rome, where St. Catherine is buried. The flagpole represents the altar; the play areas represent the pews; an elephant spray shower, modeled after a Bernini sculpture, represents the center aisle; and the lilies planted throughout the park symbolize St. Catherine herself. St. Catherine of Siena Church stands outside the park, across 68th Street.

Historic Districts

Upper East Side Historic District

This large historic district, synonymous with wealth and social standing, stretches along Central Park and Fifth Avenue, from 59th Street to 78th Street, and contains a diverse mixture of significant brownstone row houses, opulent town houses, stupendous mansions, and magnificent apartment buildings. Renovation is hardly a new concept, and many of these town houses were stylishly re-invented in the early 1900s. In 1909, for example, the firm of Denby & Nute converted to an elegant neo-Classical design the façade of the limestone building at 41 East 67th Street, originally built by Breen & Nason in 1879.

Carnegie Hill

One-hundred-years ago, Louise and Andrew Carnegie’s grand urban planning real-estate scheme, as well as their French-chateaux-style mansion, still the centerpiece of this landmark-dense Manhattan neighborhood, result in the premier Manhattan historic district. Beginning with two small (mid-block) streets, west of Park Avenue, this historic district expanded (and expanded) to encompass 87th to 98th Street, and virtually every architecturally remarkable building between Lexington and Fifth Avenues. Institutions, museums, schools, religious or secular, and embassies now inhabit the robber-baron mansions of yore; except two, which are now reconstituted as a private Mc Mansion.

Hardenbergh/Rhinelander

The Northern Renaissance Revival style of the six row houses and one “French Flats” building that comprise this tiny historic district are characteristic of the type of buildings that began springing up in the Carnegie Hill–Yorkville area in the late 19th century. Named for Henry J. Hardenbergh, the architect who designed the buildings, and the Rhinelanders, a prominent Manhattan real-estate family who developed the property, the picturesque houses are distinguished by red brick, brownstone, and red terra-cotta. Andy Warhol was one of the best-known residents.

Henderson Place

A dead-end street named for John C. Henderson, a prosperous fur importer turned real-estate developer, is at the center of this Upper East Side district, the site of 24 charming Queen Anne–style houses—designed by the architectural firm of Lamb and Rich, completed in 1882, and with exteriors that have changed little over the centuries. The two-story houses are topped with dormer windows mounted on steeply sloping slate roofs; many are set back from the sidewalk by front yards. The husband-and-wife actors Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne are among the notables who’ve lived here at one time or another.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, designed by Richard Morris Hunt, completed in 1902 and distinguished by its Beaux Arts façade, anchors this historic district on the eastern edge of Central Park, known for its sumptuous town houses and luxurious apartment houses. The earliest example of such a building is the Fifth Avenue classic–Nine Hundred Ninety-Eight Fifth Avenue, at 8st Street, designed by McKim, Mead, and White, and completed in 1910. Other significant buildings include the nearly unchanged neo-Greco- style row houses at 145–151 East 72nd Street, designed by Sillman & Farnsworth and completed in 1881.

Treadwell Farm

Although surrounded by high-rises, the tree-lined streets of this Upper East Side district—named for Adam Treadwell, the wealthy fur merchant who owned the property—as a country farm—contain well-preserved three- and-four-story town houses, built between 1868 and 1876, in the classical style of the French Second Empire. Flower boxes in the windows and attractive iron areaway railings add to the distinctive neighborhood character. Though many of the houses have been altered, some retain their original features, such as the window moldings at 209 East 61st Street.

 

Upper East Side Neighborhood to Zip Code Index

(including 65, 21, 75, 28, 128)

Carnegie Hill 128

Metropolitan Museum District 28

Lenox Hill 21, 75

Sociable Sixties 65

Yorkville 128, 28, 21, 65 (east of Second Avenue)

Nearby: Spanish Harlem 29, Sutton Place 22

Nearby: 10022, 29

 

The former Manhattan Square

Upper West Side

 This picturesque slice of Manhattan, located between Central Park and the Hudson River, from 59th Street to 96th (though history proves 110th), boasts blocks of stately brownstones, beautiful boulevards, two vast parks, and several significant institutions. Originally known as the Bloomingdale District, its farms and country houses eventually gave way to a busy residential and commercial neighborhood, with Broadway cutting through the middle, which includes such iconic apartment buildings as the Dakota, Apthorp, and Belnord Apartments such cultural attractions as Lincoln Center, the American Museum of Natural History and New York Historical Society. Although diverse in population, the Upper West Side once known as an important Jewish community and renown for attracting European-refugee therapists in particular. Frederick Law Olmstead designed the waterfront Riverside Park, with its playgrounds, distinctive stonework, and the 79th Street Boat Basin, where many houseboats are docked.

Parks

Riverside Park

An Upper West Side treasure and New York landmark that stretches from 59th Street to Harlem along the Hudson River, Riverside Park, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, Calvert Vaux, and others, is a place for bike riding, picnicking, jogging, dog walking, softball, viewing the sunset, boating (from the 79th Street Marina), and even peregrine-falcon-watching. A recent addition, Riverside Park South, includes basketball courts, a soccer field, and a public pier.

Among the park’s notable monuments are the Eleanor Roosevelt Monument (72nd Street), the Robert Ray Hamilton Fountain (76th Street), the Warsaw Ghetto Memorial Plaza (83rd Street), Charles and Arthur Stoughton’s Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument (89th Street), Anna Vaughn Hyatt Huntington’s bronze Joan of Arc equestrian sculpture (93rd Street), the John Mervin Carrère Memorial terrace and balustrade (97th Street), H. Van Buren Magonigle and Attilio Piccirilli’s Firemen’s Memorial (100th Street), Bruno Louis Zimm’s Woman’s Health Protective Association Fountain (116th Street), and the Amiable Child Monument (123rd Street), not to mention the Solder’s and Sailor’s memorial or Grant’s tomb.

Central Park

Central Park is a world-class Midtown, Upper East and West Side, and Uptown neighborhood amenity. For a complete report, read Regarding Real Estates’ unique take, along with its highlights and photography gallery.

Damrosch Park

Part of Lincoln Center, Damrosch Park was named for a musical family whose patriarch, orchestral conductor Leopold Damrosch, emigrated here from Prussia in 1871. The 3,000-seat Daniel and Florence Guggenheim band shell, set amid an extensive layout of benches and planter beds, is the park’s main attraction. Notable events presented in past years include the Lincoln Center Festival, Lincoln Center Out of Doors, Midsummer Night Swing (a series of outdoor dance parties featuring such singers as Nellie McKay), and the Big Apple Circus).

Sherman Square

Known to film buffs as the gritty setting of the 1971 Al Pacino movie The Panic in Needle Park, Sherman Square, located at the intersection of Broadway and Amsterdam Avenue, across from the elegant 72nd Street subway station, is named after General William Tecumseh Sherman. This tiny park, possibly the smallest in the city, has since been transformed into a slice of tranquility on a bustling boulevard. The park is home to a rose garden and a bronze tablet that pays tribute to all people who perished in war. In addition, it boosts two landmark residences: the Ansonia Hotel and the Dime Savings Bank, now converted to a loft-like apartments.

Theodore Roosevelt Park

Traditionally called “Museum Park” or “Dinosaur Park” by neighborhood residents because it surrounds the American Museum of Natural History, on the Upper West Side, Theodore Roosevelt Park, across the street from Central Park, pays homage to the 26th president of the United States. The park’s Theodore Roosevelt Memorial features a bronze statue by James Earle Fraser mounted on a neoclassical granite pedestal designed by John Russell Pope. The park is also home to the expansive Bull Moose Dog Run, named after Roosevelt’s Progressive political party, and the Margaret Meade Green.

Historic Districts

Riverside-West End

Elaborately embellished Beaux-Arts, Renaissance, Gothic, and Romanesque-style apartment houses, built between 1895 and 1939, line both West End Avenue and the graceful curves of Riverside Drive. Picturesque side streets lined with harmonious Renaissance Revival­–style row houses connect the two boulevards. The Rice Mansion, on Riverside and 89th Street, completed in 1903, is one of two surviving mansions. The six- and seven-story buildings on West 93rd Street, similar in style to both the row houses and larger apartments, offer a view of the Joan of Arc statue in Riverside Park.

Riverside Drive-West 80th-81st Street

By 1900, the area by Riverside Park, once a site of shantytowns and grazing goats, had evolved into one of the most fashionable residential neighborhoods in the city, and Riverside Drive had become known as one of the most beautiful boulevards in the world. Architect and developer Clarence F. True, who constructed 21 town houses in the district, was largely responsible for the transformation. The row houses at 306–314 West 81st Street and 307–319 West 80th Street, built in 1892 and 1894, respectively, for developer Bernard S. Levy, remain standing.

Riverside-West 105th Street

Rich in history (a skirmish from the Battle of Harlem Heights was fought nearby) and rich in scenery (the New York Herald, in 1890, extolled the beauty of the glittering Hudson River), this little district, bordering Riverside Park, is known for its quiet side streets, well-preserved French Beaux Arts–style houses, and prominent residents. Around the turn of the 20th century, Westinghouse Air Brake Company president H. Herman Westinghouse lived at 310 West 105th Street. Members of the Davis family (the baking-powder magnates) bought 330 Riverside Drive in 1905 and remained there until the 1950s.

Upper West Side/Central Park West

This vibrant district includes richly detailed brownstone row houses, built between 1880 and 1910 and located on the side streets; neo-Greco and Romanesque Revival style buildings, built in the 1890s and found on Columbus and Amsterdam Avenues; and the grand Beaux-Art, neo-Renaissance, and Art Deco apartment buildings that form Central Park West’s iconic skyline and were built before and after World War I. The famed Dakota, on 72nd Street, was completed in 1884, one of four apartment houses built that year. Also located here are the American Museum of Natural History and the New York Historical Society.

West 71st Street

This secluded cul-de-sac, a historic district less than a block long, consists of 33 Renaissance Revival–style row houses, designed by four architectural firms and built between 1893 and 1896. Though the individual houses vary in details, all the façades are brownstone on the south side of the street and brick, stone, and terra-cotta on the north side; all the cornices are of uniform height; and all feature such design elements as stoops, bows, and oriels. The block includes a town house built in 1904 and an apartment building completed in 1924.

West End-Collegiate

The most striking piece of architecture in this district, which was called “Bloemendael” by its early Dutch settlers and is now comprised mostly of fashionable apartment buildings and town houses, is the West End Collegiate Church, on West End Avenue, completed in 1892. Urged to design the church in a manner similar to the surrounding buildings, McKim Mead & White chose Dutch Colonial style and based their plan on old buildings in Amsterdam. Architect Robert W. Gibson patterned his exterior plan on the Vleeshal, a 400-year-old church in Harlem.

 

Upper West Side Neighborhood to Zip Code Index

Morningside Heights 27

Manhattan Valley 25

Riverside Drive-West End Avenue 25, 24, 23

Central Park West Corridor 25, 24, 23

Ansonia Station 23

Lincoln Square 23

Nearby: Harlem 26, West 50s 19

 

Uptown

Astor Row, a unique row of set-back, semi-attached, single-family dwellings,

Astor Row

Though Ralph Ellison defined Harlem as anyplace “uptown” where “Negroes live,” this African-American cultural center is now a gentrified, multi-racial neighborhood of spacious apartment buildings and brownstones. Hamilton Heights’ leafy streets are home to many actors, artists, and teachers; people all over the borough travel to Manhattanville’s Fairway Supermarket for fresh produce; and Morningside Heights, site of Barnard College, Columbia University and enumerable religious institutions, has always been a college town within the city. Even Spanish Harlem, one of New York’s largest Latino communities, has seen a spike in cultural recognition.

Parks

Central Park is a world-class Midtown, Upper East and West Side, and Uptown neighborhood amenity. For a complete report, read Regarding Real Estates’ unique take, along with its highlights and photography gallery.

Marcus Garvey Park

This East Harlem oasis, named for Black Nationalist leader Marcus Mosiah Garvey, serves as a full-service community center and is one of the city’s oldest public squares. The park features an amphitheater for plays and concerts, indoor and outdoor pools, two playgrounds designed for use by disabled children, and a recreation center providing after-school supervision and swimming, kickboxing, yoga, karate, and computer instruction. An outcropping of Manhattan schist and the Mount Morris Fire Watchtower (set atop the schist) are the park’s two most prominent features.

Morningside Park

Set on a rugged cliff of Manhattan schist perfect for viewing the sunrise over Harlem, Morningside Park is yet another example of Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux’s handiwork. The park includes playgrounds, basketball courts, a picnic area, softball diamonds, an arboretum, and numerous monuments, such as Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi’s Lafayette and Washington, Karl Bitter and Henry Bacon’s Carl Schurz Memorial, and Edgar Walters’s Seligman Bear and Faun Fountain. The foundation crater for a gym whose proposed building sparked a 1968 Columbia University uprising is now an ornamental pond and waterfall.

Riverside Park

An Upper West Side treasure and New York landmark that stretches from 59th Street to Harlem along the Hudson River, Riverside Park, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, Calvert Vaux, and others, is a place for bike riding, picnicking, jogging, dog walking, softball, viewing the sunset, boating (from the 79th Street Marina), and even peregrine-falcon-watching. A recent addition, Riverside Park South, includes basketball courts, a soccer field, and a public pier.

Among the park’s notable monuments are the Eleanor Roosevelt Monument (72nd Street), the Robert Ray Hamilton Fountain (76th Street), the Warsaw Ghetto Memorial Plaza (83rd Street), Charles and Arthur Stoughton’s Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument (89th Street), Anna Vaughn Hyatt Huntington’s bronze Joan of Arc equestrian sculpture (93rd Street), the John Mervin Carrère Memorial terrace and balustrade (97th Street), H. Van Buren Magonigle and Attilio Piccirilli’s Firemen’s Memorial (100th Street), Bruno Louis Zimm’s Woman’s Health Protective Association Fountain (116th Street), and the Amiable Child Monument (123rd Street

Historic Districts

Manhattan Avenue

Joseph M. Dunn, C. P. H. Gilbert, and Edward Angell designed the 37 three-story brick- and-stone Victorian row houses in this picturesque Manhattan Valley enclave, completed in 1890. Dunn’s buildings, between 104th and 106th Streets, feature widely varying arches and gables; Gilbert’s, across the street, are Queen Anne style and have stained-glass windows and gables with sunburst motifs; Angell’s neo-Romanesque houses, one block south, feature unusual terra-cotta panels. The district also includes an apartment building and two hospital buildings—one neo-Gothic, the other château-esque.

 

Uptown Neighborhood to Zip Code Index

5. Jumel-Morris District 32

6. Hamilton Heights 31

7. Sugar Hill 31

8. Manhattanville 27, 31

9. South Harlem 26

10. Spanish Harlem 37, 35, 29

Nearby: Hudson Height 32, Fort George 40, Morningside Heights 27, Manhattan Valley 25, Carnegie Hill 128

 

1810, Morris-Jumel mansion

Upper Manhattan

Due to its separation from Midtown by Harlem and its relative lack of a grass-roots “cult” gentrification too many New Yorkers treat this non-trendy section of Manhattan as if it’s one of the outer boroughs. But with an abundance of roomy, Pre-war, Art Deco–style apartment buildings, extraordinary Hudson River views, and a unprecedented wealth of parkland (notably Inwood Hill and the smaller Fort Tyron Park), Upper Manhattan—consisting of Inwood, Washington Heights, and Hudson Heights—may be the final frontier of reasonable real estate. This predominantly Dominican neighborhood is also home to Columbia University Medical Center and Yeshiva University.

Parks

J. Hood Wright Park

The most distinctive feature of J. Hood Wright Park, named for a philanthropist who contributed to the New York Public Library, is Terry Fugate-Wilcox’s sculpture 3000 A.D. Diffusion Piece, which juts up monolith-like from the park’s observation deck, where visitors can enjoy vistas of the George Washington Bridge and the Hudson River. The park also offers handball, volleyball, and basketball courts, a ball field, a dog run, and a playground with equipment that resembles the George Washington Bridge. Geological curiosities include a cave similar to those found in Inwood Hill Park.

Fort Tyron Park

Named for Sir William Tryon, New York’s last British governor, and designed by Frederick Law Olmsted Jr., whose father designed Central Park, Fort Tryon Park is known for its panoramic views of the Hudson River and the Bronx. The Cloisters, a medieval art museum modeled after a Romanesque monastery, anchors the park’s north end. Eight miles of heavily wooded pedestrian paths, beginning at Margaret Corbin Circle—named for the Revolutionary War heroine—wind past the renovated Heather Garden, two playgrounds, a café, and Eduardo Ramirez’s abstract sculpture Columnade.

Fort Washington Park

Offering spectacular vistas of the George Washington Bridge and the New Jersey Palisades across the Hudson River, Fort Washington Park, named for the Revolutionary War redoubt, is home to the decommissioned Little Red Lighthouse, narrator of a popular children’s book and Manhattan’s only lighthouse. In addition to its baseball fields, basketball courts, tennis courts, and playground, the park is an ideal spot for peregrine-falcon-watching. The temple-like shelter at Inspiration Point is a perfect place to take in all the scenery.

Highbridge Park

Baseball fans consider the area of Highbridge Park called Coogan’s Bluff, where the Polo Grounds once stood, as sacred ground. Here, in 1951, Bobby Thompson hit his miraculous home run against the Brooklyn Dodgers, propelling the Giants into the World Series. Also famous for its landmark High Bridge (the city’s oldest standing bridge) and High Bridge Tower, the park, overlooking the Harlem River, offers dramatic vistas from its magnificent cliffs, a greenway for riverside biking, a barbecue area, dog runs, playgrounds, and, of course, baseball fields.

Sherman Creek Park

Ground has been broken for five small Upper Manhattan parks, collectively known as Sherman Creek Park, that will reconnect the Inwood community with the Harlem River waterfront. These street-end green spaces will be accessible to the handicapped and feature waterfront seating, ornamental native plants, a kayak launch, a tree-shaded picnic and barbeque area, a performance space, game tables, a spray-shower plaza, and food vendors. Sherman Creek Park is the first phase in the city’s effort to provide continuous waterfront access from Dyckman Street to the University Heights Bridge.

Inwood Hill Park

Home to the last natural forest and salt marsh in the borough, Inwood Hill Park, at Manhattan’s northern tip, has been largely untouched since European settlers arrived. With its caves, valleys, and ridges carved by Ice Age glaciers, the park is a geology student’s dream that also offers extraordinary vistas of the Hudson River alongside numerous recreational facilities and historical sites, such as Fort Cockhill, at Spuyten Duyvil. Features include the Dyckman Marina, hiking trails, bike trails, athletic fields, playgrounds, dog runs, and a barbecue area.

Historic Districts

Audubon Terrace

Tucked into a tranquil corner southwest of Washington Heights, on Broadway and 155th Street, Audubon Terrace—named after the ornithologist John James Audubon—is one of the city’s best-kept secrets. This cultural center’s buildings, designed by Charles Platt Huntington and William Mitchell Kendall in the neo–Italian Renaissance style, house the Hispanic Society of America, the American Numismatic Society, the American Geographical Society, the Church of our Lady Esperanza, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the National Institute of Arts and Letters. The plaza features the sculptures of Anna Vaughn Hyatt Huntington.

Hamilton Heights/Hamilton Terrace

Stately, serene Convent Avenue runs down the middle of this district, located on the site where the Battle of Harlem Heights was fought, in 1776, and where Alexander Hamilton built his home, Hamilton Grange, which in 2008 was moved to St. Nicholas Park. Nearby City College of New York in 1907 opened its “Uptown” campus and its faculty members often chose to live in the neighborhood. In the 1930s this was considered the ultimate for many affluent African-Americans who moved into the neoclassical apartment buildings, including Duke Ellington, whose song (with Billy Strayhorn) “Take the A Train” spoke of Sugar Hill. The area’s population is still predominantly African-American.

Jumel Terrace

George Washington may have used the Morris-Jumel Mansion as his Revolutionary War headquarters, but cobblestoned Sylvan Terrace, lined with flickering gas street lamps and two-dozen well-preserved wooden houses built in 1882, makes this north Harlem historic district, named for French wine merchant Stephen Jumel, seem as if it were a neighborhood that time forgot. The eclectic architectural styles of the 40-plus other 19th- and early-20th-century row houses in the area include Queen Anne, Romanesque Revival, and Classical Revival. The district’s one neo-Federal–style apartment house was built in 1909.

 

Upper Manhattan Neighborhood to Zip Code Index

Inwood 34

Washington Heights 33

Hudson Heights 33

Fort George 40

Nearby: Sugar Hill 31 Jumel-Morris 32